Race, Ethnicity, and Minority Housing in the United States

By Jamshid A. Momeni | Go to book overview

the efforts of the public sector to take an active role in the delivery of housing to the general populace.

The consequence of this is a segmented housing market in which the state has been permitted to play an overt role in the provision of housing for specifically targeted groups. In contrast to the British experience ( Merrett, 1979; Dunleavy, 1981), housing in the United States did not become a universal entitlement program. In fact, public housing and related programs have been funded at such minimal levels that only a small percentage of the eligible target populations have been served. The past five years have witnessed a further attempt to constrict the definitions of those who would qualify for governmental assistance, but in some respects this is a quantitative and not a qualitative change from preceding administrations. At this particular historical juncture, the call for an entitlement program ( Hartman, 1983: 51-53), especially if seen as a prelude for moving towards a social welfare program that would entail the "decommodification of housing" ( Achtenberg and Marcuse, 1983: 202-31) has very little political support. Indeed, the immediate future would seem to signal an increasingly leaner and meaner welfare state. Because of this, the goal of the Housing Act of 1949 will remain, for a sizable portion of the lower-class minority community, unrealized.


References

Aaron Henry. 1972. Shelter and Subsidies: Who Benefits from Federal Housing Policies? Washington, D.C.: The Brookings Institution.

Achtenberg Emily, and Peter Marcuse. 1983. "Toward a Decommodification of Housing". In America's Housing Crisis, edited by Chester Hartman, 202-31. Boston: Routledge and Kegan Paul.

Aronovici Carol. 1939. Housing the Masses. New York: John Wiley and Sons.

Ashley E. Everett. 1941. "Government Housing Activities". Harvard Business Review 19 ( 2): 230-42.

Baron Richard. 1974. "St. Louis Restoring its Public Housing Image by Moving into Tenant Management". In Public Housing Management in the Seventies, edited by Frederic Vogelsang. Washington, D.C.: NAHRO.

Bauer Catherine. 1934. "Housing: Paper Plans or a Workers' Movement?" In America Can't Have Housing, edited by Carol Aronovici. New York: Museum of Modern Art.

-----. 1957. "The Dreary Deadlock of Public Housing". Architectural Forum (May): 138-48.

Bowly Devereaux. 1978. The Poorhouse: Subsidized Housing in Chicago, 1895- 1976. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press.

Boyd Gerald. 1984. "Vouchers--Key to Housing the Poor?" New York Times (19 February): 4E.

Bredemeier Harry. 1955. "The Federal Public Housing Movement: A Case Study of Social Change." Ph.D. dissertation. New York: Columbia University.

Brill William. 1976. Comprehensive Security Planning. Washington, D.C.: GPO.

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