Race, Ethnicity, and Minority Housing in the United States

By Jamshid A. Momeni | Go to book overview

11
Minority Housing Needs and Civil Rights Enforcement

John M. Goering


Introduction

In May 1985, a police helicopter firebombed a building in Philadelphia encouraged in part because local residents in the "neat, middle-income neighborhood" complained of the dirt, rats, and noise coming from the building ( Gruson, 1985: 1; Peterson, 1985: A1). The same day, the New York Times reported the results of a survey of New Yorkers which revealed that the majority lived in segregated neighborhoods, half were aware that their friends used racial slurs, and most felt there was a "harsher" mood in race relations. The survey reported that some blacks were expressing more conservative views towards race relations. One black teenager, reportedly shocked at finding books by Huey Newton and Eldridge Cleaver in his mother's bookcase, asked "how could you even be associated with that kind of revolutionary, radical philosophy?" ( Dowd, 1985: B4).

The desire of black residents in Philadelphia to preserve the character of their neighborhood and homes, and the antipathy of some New Yorkers toward radical action, are snapshots of a shifting mosaic of minority attitudes, needs, and strategies for change. Is there a growing national mood of conservatism in the area of housing for minorities? Is there less to complain about and less to fight for in the area of housing and fair housing? What are the principle differences affecting the choices and options of minorities? What, in brief, are the obstacles to equity in minority housing opportunities in the 1980s?

The purpose of this chapter is to address these questions by examining three specific features of minority housing conditions and opportunities. The three areas are: 1) minority housing problems; 2) housing discrimi

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Race, Ethnicity, and Minority Housing in the United States
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Contributions in Ethnic Studies Series Editor: Leonard W. Doob ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Figure and Tables ix
  • Foreword xv
  • Series Foreword xvii
  • Acknowledgments xix
  • Introduction xxi
  • References xxiv
  • 1: A Historical Review of Changes in Public Housing Policies and Their Impacts on Minorities 1
  • Introduction 1
  • Conclusion 14
  • References 15
  • 2: Racial Inequalities in Housing: An Examination of Recent Trends 19
  • Introduction 19
  • Notes 36
  • Acknowledgments 36
  • References 37
  • 3: Racial Inequalities in Home Ownership 39
  • Notes 50
  • References 51
  • 4: Blacks and the American Dream of Housing 53
  • References 65
  • 5: Housing Policy and Suburbanization: An Analysis of the Changing Quality and Quantity of Black Housing in Suburbia since 1950 69
  • Introduction 69
  • Conclusion 83
  • References 85
  • 6: The Housing Conditions of Black Female-headed Households: A Comparative Analysis 89
  • Acknowledgments 107
  • References 108
  • 7: Accessibility to Housing: Differential Residential Segregation for Blacks, Hispanics, American Indians, and Asians 109
  • Introduction 109
  • References 125
  • 8: Su casa no es mi casa: Hispanic Housing Conditions in Contemporary America, 1949- 1980 127
  • Notes 143
  • References 144
  • 9: American Indian Housing: An Overview of Conditions and Public Policy 147
  • Acknowledgments 174
  • References 174
  • 10: Housing Problems of Asian Americans 177
  • References 193
  • 11: Minority Housing Needs and Civil Rights Enforcement 195
  • Introduction 195
  • Conclusions 209
  • Notes 211
  • Acknowledgments 212
  • Selected Bibliography 217
  • Index 221
  • About the Contributors 223
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