Varieties of Memory and Consciousness: Essays in Honour of Endel Tulving

By Henry L. Roediger III; Fergus I. M. Craik et al. | Go to book overview

Preface

The present volume grew out of a conference held at the University of Toronto in May, 1987. The occasion was a celebration of Endel Tulving's 60th birthday. As organizers, we had envisioned a first-rate scientific conference that would also include social events worthy of the occasion. The three-day episode exceeded our expectations and we are pleased to present this volume in Endel's honour.

Endel Tulving in a unique figure in cognitive psychology. His research, writing, theories, and personality have strongly influenced everyone who attended the conference, and probably anyone who would be reading these words. A brief biographical sketch, taken from the American Psychologist, follows this Foreword. Endel's magnetism can be seen from the strong attraction of our conference, as it pulled in people from all over the world; Nobuo Ohta came from Japan, Don Thomson from Australia, Lars-Göran Nilsson from Sweden, and Donald Broadbent, John Gardiner, and Lawrence Weiskrantz from England. In addition, others came from all over the United States and Canada. Each session of the conference was attended by 75 to 100 people.

The conference was organized around four Endelian themes, with a session devoted to each. These were: Encoding and Retrieval Processes; Neuropsychology of Memory; Classificatory Systems for Memory; and Consciousness, Emotion, and Memory. In each session there were four speakers and a commentator, for a total of 20 participants over the three day event. We have chosen to organize the book along exactly the same lines. The primary departure from the conference proceedings is that Mortimer Mishkin presented an excellent paper at the conference, but could not contribute a chapter. We are happy that Morris Moscovitch, who could not attend. the conference because of a prior commitment, has provided a chapter in the Neuropsychology section.

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