WE have come to the end of the study that we set out to make. Step by step, we have marked the evolution of modern painting, from the Byzantine traditions which prevailed before Cimabue down to the latest possibilities introduced by the pointilliste method of Monet.

We have made the acquaintance of a majority of the greatest artists; of those who, being themselves men of originality, exercised a wide influence on others. In studying their points of view, and their methods of rendering what they saw in the way they felt it, we have gained a general insight into pictorial methods and motives, that will enable us to appreciate the infinite varieties of the same as they appear in other artists.

Turn by turn, we have visited different countries, according as the art of painting flourished in them simultaneously, or as it declined in one and reappeared with vigor in another. And, doing so, we have found that the manifestations of art have varied in response to the racial and temporary conditions of each country; and, while we have not attempted to explain genius as the result of these, we have examined how they influenced it.

We have seen how one impulse of movement followed another; all of them involving truth, but none monopolizing the whole truth; in fact, that the manifestations and possibilities of painting are wide and various as

-479-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
How to Study Pictures
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • List of Illustrations ix
  • Author's Note xiii
  • I - Introduction 3
  • II - Cimabue -- Giotto 8
  • III - Masaccio -- Mantegna 20
  • IV - Fra Angelico -- Jan Van Eyck 37
  • V - Botticelli -- Memling 52
  • VI - Perogino -- Bellini 68
  • VII - Raphael -- Wolgemuth 85
  • VIII - Da Vinci -- DÜrer 109
  • IX - Titian -- Holbein the Younger 125
  • X - Correggio -- Michelangelo 142
  • XI - Veronese -- Tintoretto 159
  • XII - Rubens -- Velasquez 177
  • XIII - Van Dyck -- Frans Hals 195
  • XIV - Rembrandt -- Murillo 209
  • XV - Jacob van Ruisdael -- Poussin 228
  • XVI - Hobbema -- Claude Lorrain 242
  • XVII - Watteau -- Hogarth 255
  • XVIII - Reynolds -- Gainsborough 272
  • XIX - Constable -- Turner 287
  • XX - David -- Delacroix 304
  • XXI - Rousseau -- Corot 322
  • XXII - Breton -- Millet 339
  • XXIII - Courbet -- Boecklin 353
  • XXIV - Rossetti -- Holman Hunt 371
  • XXV - Piloty -- Fortuny 391
  • XXVI - Manet -- Israels 404
  • XXVII - Puvis de Chavannes -- GÉrÔme 423
  • XXVIII - Whistler -- Sargent 441
  • XXIX - Monet -- Hashimoto Gaho 457
  • Concluding Note 479
  • Parrallel Chronology of Painters Included *
  • A Brief Bibliography of Books On Art Readily Procurable 481
  • Glossary of Terms 484
  • Index 493
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 516

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.