Magic Shadows: The Story of the Origin of Motion Pictures

By Martin Quigley Jr. | Go to book overview
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XIV
MAREY AND MOVEMENT

Marey in Paris, and Muybridge and Isaacs in San Francisco, record motion by photographs--Ducos du Hauron has an idea for a complete system--Janssen makes a "movie" camera--Reynauld keeps magic shadow showmanship alive --Anschütz uses electricity.

THE DEVELOPMENT capital in the story of the magic shadow art-science shifted many times. Seas, mountains, oceans and time itself were no barriers. Successively, Greece, Arabia, Persia, England, Italy, Holland, Belgium, Austria and the United States took the' lead in showing the way toward the goal of genuinely life-like pictures. After the great spurt of activity in Philadelphia, during the working life of the Langenheims, the chief center of activity was Paris and the leader was Etienne Jules Maiey.

Plateau in Belgium came to the invention of the magic disk, which was the first "motion picture" device, through his study of vision and the desire to understand more about it. Marey, by his own action and the work of others influenced by him, gave great impetus to the photographing and projection of motion pictures, through his wish to learn more about movement, the movement of life--animals, birds, and men.

Marey was one of the first great physiologists and conducted for years what was then the only private, scientific laboratory in France. He was born in Beaume, France, in 1830, and when nineteen went to Paris to study medicine. Six years later he became an interne and, in 1859, received his doctor's degree, doing at this

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