Magic Shadows: The Story of the Origin of Motion Pictures

By Martin Quigley Jr. | Go to book overview

Appendix I
MAGIC SHADOWS A Descriptive Chronology
B. C.
? First artist's aspiration to recreate life and the movement
of the world of nature.
6000
to
1500
Babylonians and Egyptians acquire first scientific knowl-
edge of the light and shadow art-science. Crude magnify-
ing glasses are fashioned. Light and shadow are used for
entertainment and deception.
Chinese Shadow Plays make use of silhouette figures cast
on a screen of smoke.
Japanese and English mirrors are devices for reflecting
strange optical illusions.
340 Aristotle gives impetus to all studies. First recorded magic
shadow experiment--"the square hole and round sun."
Euclid demonstrates that light travels in straight lines,
a fundamental for all projection and photography.
225 Archimedes devises the famous "Burning Glasses" for
destroying ships of the enemy, which may or may not have
been a factor in the defense of Syracuse.
60 Lucretius, the Roman poet, writes De Rerum Natura, "On
the Nature of Things," combining verse and philosophy
and a bit of science. The work contains a reference errone-
ously interpreted as a description of a magic lantern show.
A. D.
50 Pliny and Seneca advance scientific knowledge. The effect
of the atmosphere on silver is noted by Pliny. Seneca writes
on the persistence of the sensation of vision.

-163-

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Magic Shadows: The Story of the Origin of Motion Pictures
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 5
  • Illustrations 6
  • Foreword 7
  • Introduction 9
  • I It Started with "A" 13
  • II Friar Bacon's Magic 24
  • III Da Vinci's Camera 29
  • IV Porta, First Screen Showman 36
  • V Kepler and the Stars 43
  • VI Kircher's 100th Art 48
  • VII Popularizing Kircher's Projector 62
  • VIII Musschenbroek and Motion 70
  • IX Phantasmagoria 75
  • X Dr. Paris' Toy 80
  • XI Plateau Creates Motion Pictures 85
  • XII The Baron's Projector 98
  • XIII The Langenheims of Philadelphia 106
  • XIV Marey and Movement 115
  • XV Edison's Peep-Show 130
  • XVI First Steps 139
  • XVII World Premieres 149
  • Appendix I MAGIC SHADOWS A Descriptive Chronology 163
  • Appendix II BIBLIOGRAPHY and Acknowledgements 177
  • Index 185
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