Handbook for Teaching Introductory Psychology

By Ludy T. Benjamin Jr.; Robert S. Daniel et al. | Go to book overview

Handbook For Teaching Introductory Psychology

edited by Ludy T. Benjamin Jr. Texas A & M University

Robert S. Daniel University of Missouri-Columbia

Charles L. Brewer Furman University

LAWRENCE ERLBAUM ASSOCIATES, PUBLISHERS

1985 Hillsdale, New Jersey London

-i-

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Handbook for Teaching Introductory Psychology
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Table of Contents iii
  • Preface vii
  • Section I Issues and Approaches in Teaching Introductory Psychology 1
  • 1. Course Organization 3
  • Notes 6
  • Psychological Seduction: Effective Organization of the Introductory Course 7
  • Notes 12
  • The Introductory Psychology Course in the Eighties 13
  • An Organizational Framework for the Teaching of Basic Psychology 15
  • 2. a Variety of Approaches to the Introductory Course 18
  • 2. A VARIETY OF APPROACHES TO THE INTRODUCTORY COURSE 18
  • Notes 22
  • Notes 22
  • Notes 27
  • Notes 27
  • Notes 29
  • Effective Teaching: Facilitative vs. Directive Style 30
  • Notes 31
  • Notes 31
  • Notes 33
  • Notes 33
  • An Individual Differences Model for The Design of Courses in General Psychology 34
  • Notes 36
  • Notes 36
  • Notes 39
  • Notes 40
  • Notes 40
  • 3. Team Teaching Approaches 41
  • Notes 43
  • Notes 43
  • Notes 46
  • Notes 46
  • Notes 47
  • Notes 50
  • 4. Psi, Mastery, and Other Individualized Approaches 51
  • Notes 53
  • Notes 56
  • Notes 56
  • Notes 56
  • Notes 59
  • Notes 59
  • Systematic Manipulation of Student Pacing, the Perfection Requirement, and Contact with a Teaching Assistant in an Introductory Psychology Course 60
  • Notes 64
  • Instructor-Paced, Mass-Testing for Mastery Performance in an Introductory Psychology Course 65
  • Notes 68
  • References 72
  • Notes 72
  • 5. Selecting a Textbook 73
  • 5. SELECTING A TEXTBOOK 73
  • Notes 76
  • Notes 76
  • 6. Conceptions of Students in Introductory Psychology 78
  • 6. CONCEPTIONS OF STUDENTS IN INTRODUCTORY PSYCHOLOGY 78
  • Notes 81
  • Notes 81
  • Notes 84
  • Notes 84
  • Misconceptions of Psychology and Performance In the Introductory Course 85
  • Note 87
  • Some More Misconceptions About Psychology Among Introductory Psychology Students 88
  • Notes 91
  • Notes 91
  • Notes 94
  • Notes 94
  • 7. Motivating Students in Introductory Psychology 95
  • 7. MOTIVATING STUDENTS IN INTRODUCTORY PSYCHOLOGY 95
  • Notes 99
  • References 104
  • Notes 104
  • References 106
  • Incentive Preferences of Introductory Psychology Students 107
  • Incentive Preferences of Introductory Psychology Students 109
  • Incentive Preferences of Introductory Psychology Students 109
  • 8. Use of Student Teaching Assistants 110
  • 8. USE OF STUDENT TEACHING ASSISTANTS 110
  • Notes 113
  • Notes 113
  • Notes 115
  • Notes 115
  • Notes 121
  • Notes 121
  • Notes 123
  • Notes 124
  • 9. Testing in the Introductory Course 125
  • Notes 126
  • Notes 127
  • Notes 132
  • Notes 132
  • Notes 134
  • Notes 134
  • Notes 134
  • Notes 136
  • Section II Demonstrations and Activities in Introductory Psychology 137
  • 10. General 139
  • 10. GENERAL 139
  • Notes 142
  • Notes 142
  • Notes 145
  • Tying it All Together: Research, Concepts, and Fiction in an Introductory Psychology Course 146
  • Note 147
  • Note 147
  • Note 148
  • Note 149
  • Note 150
  • Note 151
  • Microcomputers in the Introductory Laboratory 152
  • Note 153
  • Note 154
  • Note 155
  • Note 156
  • Note 156
  • A Strategy for Increasing Class Participation 157
  • 11 Physiological Psychology 159
  • 11 PHYSIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY 159
  • Notes 162
  • Notes 162
  • 12. Perception and Sensory Processes 164
  • Notes 169
  • Notes 171
  • Notes 174
  • Notes 176
  • Notes 176
  • 13. Learning 180
  • 13. LEARNING 180
  • Note 182
  • Note 182
  • Note 184
  • Note 184
  • Note 184
  • Note 186
  • Note 187
  • Note 188
  • Note 188
  • Note 190
  • Note 190
  • Note 190
  • 14. Memory and Cognition 192
  • 14. MEMORY AND COGNITION 192
  • Note 193
  • Demonstrating Semantic Memory in the Teaching Laboratory with a Paper-and-Pencil Task 197
  • 15: DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY Think Old: Twenty-five Classroom Exercises For Courses in Aging 198
  • Simulated Parent-Child Interaction in an Undergraduate Child Psychology Course 202
  • 16. PERSONALITY 204
  • Note 205
  • Note 207
  • Note 208
  • 17. ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY 209
  • An Abnormal Psychology Community-Based Interview Assignment 211
  • Note 211
  • Note 212
  • The Myth of Mental Illness Game: Sick Is Just a Four Letter Word 213
  • Note 214
  • Note 214
  • Note 215
  • Note 215
  • Note 215
  • Note 216
  • Note 216
  • Note 217
  • Note 217
  • Note 219
  • Note 220
  • 19. Statistics and Methodology 221
  • 19. STATISTICS AND METHODOLOGY 221
  • Note 223
  • Note 223
  • Note 225
  • Note 225
  • References 227
  • Notes 227
  • Notes 227
  • Notes 228
  • Notes 228
  • Notes 230
  • Index 231
  • Appendix 233
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