Music of the Repressed Russian Avant-Garde, 1900-1929

By Larry Sitsky | Go to book overview

11
Vladimir M. Deshevov: The Man of the Theater

Vladimir Mihailovich Deshevov was born in St. Petersburg on February 11, 1889 and died in Leningrad on October 27, 1955. His family belonged to the intelligentsia, and so musical culture was a fact of everyday life. His father, an engineer, was a patron of music and a tireless concertgoer; his mother studied singing. Deshevov's grandmother on his mother's side was an excellent pianist. She was responsible for the first years of his pianistic life, and guided him from the early five-finger exercises to a concert level of performance. The would-be composer attended school at Tsarskoe Selo, where the family had moved a few years after his birth. Music at that time was still not recognized as a safe profession, and so it was by no means a certainty for Deshevov to move in that direction, despite his obvious talent and his ability to improvise; he happened to be equally exceptional in subjects such as physics. In 1904 he heard works by Paul Dukas and Richard Strauss,. and by 1906 he seemed more certain as to his future direction. He began studying music theory with the composer A. F. Pashchenko (theory and solfege) in that same year and in 1908 he visited Bayreuth and saturated himself with Wagner operas. He entered the St. Petersburg Conservatoire in 1908 and stayed there until 1914, with A. K. Liadov (counterpoint and fugue), M. O. Shteinberg and V. P. Kalafati (composition), as well as with A. Ya. Vinkler and L. V. Nikolaev (piano). Sergei Prokofiev was a pupil of Vinkler at the time, and must have exercised some influence on his young fellow student. He therefore belongs to that generation of composers who grew up in pre-revolutionary days, sensing or knowing that vast changes were in the making -- musical as well as political. Russian art at this time was subject to a huge number of movements and manifestos, of varying effectual durations.

St. Petersburg then boasted at least three progressive music organizations: the Russian Musical Society, the Koussevitzky Concerts and the Siloti Concerts. Richard Strauss's "Burleske" and the Rachmaninoff Second Piano Concerto were heard at concerts of the Russian Musical Society during Deshevov's first year, in the Great Hall of the St. Petersburg Conservatoire. Students had a free pass to such concerts. The Siloti and Koussevitzky Concerts featured such works as the Scriabin "Poem of Ecstasy" and "Prometheus," Stravinsky's "Firebird," "Petrouchka," and "Rite of Spring," sometimes in excerpt or in suite form; Rachmaninoff "Isle of the Dead," Third Symphony, "The Bells," and many other new works. Debussy was a guest of the Conservatoire in 1913 and Deshevov heard a number of works including "La Mer."

-171-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Music of the Repressed Russian Avant-Garde, 1900-1929
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface ix
  • Abbreviations xiii
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • 1 1
  • Bibliography 7
  • Part I - The Precursors 10
  • 2 - Vladimir I. Rebikov: The Inventor of Whole-Tone Music 10
  • Bibliography 25
  • 3: Aleksei V. Stanchinskiy 27
  • Part II - The Big Three 38
  • 4 - Nikolai A. Roslavets: The Russian Schoenberg 38
  • Bibliography 58
  • 5: Aleksandr V. Mosolov 60
  • 6: Arthur V. Lourié 87
  • Part III - The Smaller Five 111
  • 7 - Leonid A. Polovinkin: The Partial Avant-Gardist 111
  • Bibliography 132
  • 8 - Vladimir V. Shcherbachev: Old Wine in New Vessels 133
  • 9: Lev K. Knipper 149
  • 10: Boris N. Liatoshinski 158
  • 11 - Vladimir M. Deshevov: The Man of the Theater 171
  • Part IV - The Reluctant Avant-Gardists 183
  • 12 - Samuil E. Feinberg: The Post-Scriabin Pianist 183
  • Bibliography 198
  • 13: Anatoliy N. Aleksandrov 199
  • 14 - Boris A. Aleksandrov: Son of the Composer of the Soviet Anthem 216
  • Part V 217
  • 15: Aleksandr A. Krein 219
  • 16 - Grigoriy A. Krein: Toward Assimilation 225
  • Bibliography 229
  • 17 - Yulian G. Krein: Precocious Cosmopolitan 235
  • 18 - The Ukrainian Bartók and Bloch 241
  • 19: Mikhail F. Gnessin 242
  • Part VI 248
  • 20 248
  • 21: Nikolai Obukhov 254
  • 22: Iosif M. Schillinger 264
  • 23: Aleksandr N. Tcherepnine 273
  • Part VII 283
  • 24 283
  • 25: Leonid L. Sabaneev 291
  • 26 - Dmitriy M. Melkikh: Rhapsodist 309
  • 27: Gavrill N. Popov 310
  • 28: Aleksei S. Zhivotov 318
  • 29: Efim Golyshchev 323
  • 30 - Georgi M. Rimsky-Korsakov: Microtonist 328
  • Appendix: Further Scores for Study and Reference 329
  • Index 343
  • About the Author 349
  • Recent Titles in Contributions to the Study of Music and Dance 351
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 354

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.