Music of the Repressed Russian Avant-Garde, 1900-1929

By Larry Sitsky | Go to book overview

Part VI

Composers in Exile

20

Ivan A. Vyshnegradsky: Microtones

Ivan Aleksandrovich Vyshnegradsky ( Wyshnegradsky, Wyschnegradsky, Vyshnegradski, Vishnegradsky) was born in St. Petersburg on May 14, 1893 and died in Paris on September 29, 1979. A composer and theorist, Vyshnegradsky was one of a large number of emigrés who left Russia during the time of the upheavals of the first two decades of the twentieth century. Many such emigrés moved to Paris and formed there a Russian colony of some intellectual and cultural potency.

Vyshnegradsky first studied philosophy and law at the University of St. Petersburg, then gravitated to music, working with Nikolai Sokolov. This was not an unusual transition as the composer's father was a well-known music lover and supported the Conservatoire in St. Petersburg. He served on its artistic council and was able to offer financial advice as he was, by profession, a banker. Vyshnegradsky's first compositions were written under the influence of Wagner and Tchaikovsky, but then, Sokolov introduced the young composer to the music of Scriabin, which had a long-lasting effect. His first acknowledged work (the oratorio "La Journee de l'Existence") had a Scriabin-like outlook, with musical symbolism coupled with Hegelian philosophy, according to Detlef Gojowy article in the "Biographical Dictionary of Russian/Soviet Composers". Clusters already appear in this first work -- it actually ends on a five- octave cluster -- and the Scriabinesque ecstasy is never too far away.

In 1916 and 1918, Vyshnegradsky himself experienced what he later described as "cosmic consciousness," which put him squarely in the tradition of Russian mystics/composers. This experience was directly responsible for the creation of the oratorio, which his wife later claimed was "the source of his entire further output, and therefore occupies a special place in the totality of his production" (writing under her maiden name, Lucile Gayden; see bibliography). The work, with words written by the composer, deals with the development of human consciousness, from its primitive beginnings to its "absolute end: the cosmic consciousness.' About two years later, Vyshnegradsky began to compose with quarter-tones. He saw the use of microtones

-248-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Music of the Repressed Russian Avant-Garde, 1900-1929
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 354

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.