The United States Employment Service: Its History, Activities and Organization

By Darrell Hevenor Smith; Brookings Institution | Go to book overview
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THE INSTITUTE FOR GOVERNMENT RESEARCH

Washington, D. C.

The Institute for Government Research is an association of citizens for coöperating with public officials in the scientific study of government with a view to promoting efficiency and economy in its operations and advancing the science of administration. It aims to bring into existence such information and materials as will aid in the formation of public opinion and will assist officials, particularly those of the national government, in their efforts to put the public administration upon a more efficient basis.

To this end, it seeks by the thoroughgoing study and examination of the best administrative practice, public and private, American and foreign, to formulate those principles which lie at the basis of all sound administration, and to determine their proper adaptation to the specific needs of our public administration.

The accomplishment of specific reforms the Institute recognizes to be the task of those who are charged with the responsibility of legislation and administration; but it seeks to assist, by scientific study and research, in laying a solid foundation of information and experience upon which such reforms may be successfully built.

While some of the Institute's studies find application only in the form of practical coöperation with the administration officers directly concerned, many are of interest to other administrators and of general educational value. The results of such studies the Institute purposes to publish in such form as will insure for them the widest possible utilization.

Officers
Robert S. Brookings, Frank J. Goodnow,
Chairman Vice-Chairman
James F. Curtis, Frederick Strauss,
Secretary Treasurer
Trustees
Edwin A. Alderman Felix Frankfurter Samuel Mather
Robert S. Brookings Edwin F. Gay Richard B. Mellon
James F. Curtis Frank J. Goodnow Martin A. Ryerson
R. Fulton Cutting Jerome D. Greene Frederick Strauss
Frederic A. Delano Arthur T. Hadley Silas H. Strawn
Henry S. Dennison Herbert C. Hoover William H. Taft
George Eastman David F. Houston Ray Lyman Wilbur
Raymond B. Fosdick A. Lawrence Lowell Robert S. Woodward
Director
W. F. Willoughby
Editor
F. W. Powell

-ii-

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