The United States Employment Service: Its History, Activities and Organization

By Darrell Hevenor Smith; Brookings Institution | Go to book overview
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APPENDIX 2
CLASSIFICATION OF ACTIVITIES

EXPLANATORY NOTE
The Classifications of Activities in this series have for their purpose to list and classify in all practicable detail the specific activities engaged in by the several services of the national government. Such statements are of value from a number of standpoints. They furnish, in the first place, the most effective showing that can be made in brief compass of the character of the work performed by the service to which they relate. Secondly, they lay the basis for a system of accounting and reporting that will permit the showing of total expenditures classified according to activities. Finally, taken collectively, they make possible the preparation of a general or consolidated statement of the activities of the government as a whole. Such a statement will reveal in detail, not only what the government is doing, but the services in which the work is being performed. For example, one class of activities that would probably appear in such a classification is that of "scientific research." A subhead under this class would be "chemical research." Under this head would appear the specific lines of investigation under way and the services in which they were being prosecuted. It is hardly necessary to point out the value of such information in planning for future work and in considering the problem of the better distribution and coördination of the work of the government. The institute contemplates attempting such a general listing and classification of the activities of the government upon the completion of the present series.
CLASSIFICATION OF ACTIVITIES
1. General Administration
1. Intramural routine
2. Supervision of technical activities:
1. Coöperation with states in general employment work
2. Industrial employment information

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