Women Playwrights of Diversity: A Bio-Bibliographical Sourcebook

By Jane T. Peterson; Suzanne Bennett | Go to book overview

VALETTA ANDERSON

(n.d.-- )


BIOGRAPHY

Born and raised in Chicago, Illinois, Valetta Anderson has made her home in Atlanta since 1983. She began her theatre training at Atlanta's Academy Theatre School of the Performing Arts and continued her playwriting under the mentorship of Barbara Lebow. She served as Literary Manager at the Academy Theatre during the 1989-1990 season. In 1989 Anderson was awarded an Artist Initiated Grant from the Georgia Council for the Arts enabling her to begin work on the first play in a trilogy on the Montgomery family of Mississippi, part of an ongoing project to document black history.

Anderson is the executive director of the Southeast Playwrights Project (SEPP) and an active member of AlternateROOTS. She teaches playwriting to high school students through the Alliance Theatre Young Playwrights Program. In 1994 she coedited the anthology Alternate Roots: Plays from the Southern Theatre (Heinemann).

She continues to live and work in Atlanta.


PLAY DESCRIPTONS

Valetta Anderson's work is characterized by strong, black female characters trying to make sense of the world in which they live. Lively dialogue and a sense of humor are employed to explore her themes. The playwright uses language to depict subtle nuances of regionalisms, class, ethnicity, and gender and to evoke vivid poetic images. She'll Find Her Way Home is the first play in a historical trilogy in which she explores the founding of the first all-black township of Mound Bayou, Mississippi. Set in Vicksburg, Mississippi, in the early 1870s, the play tells of the emerging relationship between Martha Robb and

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