Women Playwrights of Diversity: A Bio-Bibliographical Sourcebook

By Jane T. Peterson; Suzanne Bennett | Go to book overview

JULIE JENSEN

( 1942- )


BIOGRAPHY

Jensen, who was raised in Beaver, Utah, has lived in New York City, California, Detroit, Georgia, Virginia, New Hampshire, Ohio, and, currently, Nevada. She holds a BA and MA from Utah State University and a Ph.D. in theatre from Wayne State University in Detroit. In the 1970s she began writing plays, and between 1974 and 1977, with her partner Mary Roberts, she explored improvisational methods of composition and performance. They performed their own material at the Grand Circus Exchange, Detroit, Michigan a theatre they managed for three years, at the Attic Theatre in Detroit, and in a showcase in New York. A teacher of playwriting, Jensen has taught at a number of colleges and universities and now heads the graduate program in playwriting at the University of Nevada--Las Vegas. Prior to that position, she lived in Los Angeles and wrote for film and television. She wrote episodes for a Norman Lear pilot, worked in comedy development for Columbia Pictures Television, and cowrote a half-hour film for the American Film Institute. Because of her varied geographical past, Jensen said in correspondence about herself that "she thinks she knows a lot about America."


PLAY DESCRIPTIONS

Jensen's plays often deal with troubled, working-class families who are held together by the resources of the wife and mother. The perspective is quirky and off-center, and a character's damaged psyche is manifested as a darkly humorous eccentricity. In Stray Dogs, Nyda, the mother, is married to Myers, an alcoholic, and has two young boys: one hyperactive and mean-spirited and the other well- behaved but judgmental because of his adherence to the Mormon religion. The

-184-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Women Playwrights of Diversity: A Bio-Bibliographical Sourcebook
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 402

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.