Sustainable Development in Third World Countries: Applied and Theoretical Perspectives

By Valentine Udoh James | Go to book overview

Methods of collecting user fees must be developed and should be based on the concept of willingness to pay. Ghana is developing a strategy for having a sustainable domestic tourism in order to unite the country and focus the citizens on the country's riches. This idea should be evaluated by other African countries that are interested in the tourism industry. The regional differences in Africa make the continent a strong contender in the global competition for tourist dollars. North African countries, such as Tunisia, Algeria, and Egypt, offer the Mediterranean climate and historical dimension of human civilization, West Africa offers unique cultural and wildlife environments, East Africa is famous for its wildlife and safaris, and Central and South Africa are known for their parks and reserves. Given this breadth of diversity, good planning should provide African countries rich in natural and historical resources with opportunities to embellish their economic bases.


CONCLUSION

The tourist industry has grown tremendously over the past two decades on a worldwide basis. Africa stands a good chance of enjoying the benefits of the industry. The continent is endowed with endemic natural resources. The spectacular wilderness must be protected from destruction so that there can be a perpetual attraction to the continent. The diversification of tourism would enhance the overall development of the continent. Bold strategic planning for tourism must involve overall comprehensive plans for countries interested in taking advantage of the opportunities presented by tourism.

In examining the current economic, political, and environmental conditions of many developing countries, especially countries in sub- Saharan Africa, one is bound to conclude that those countries have been condemned to pauperism. The unsustainable development in many developing countries exacerbates the poor economic and environmental conditions. Many avenues need to be explored for sustained development in Africa. Certainly, information technology can add a tremendous boost to the development of Africa. The African Information System Federation can help to transform the many development efforts in which Africans and African governments are engaged ( West Africa 1994g).

Although the continent is battered by political unrest, civil strife, and socioeconomic instability, tourism seems to be growing in some parts of the continent where it appears that the stunned economic growth can be salvaged.

At the world travel market conducted in London, England, in late 1994, many participants indicated that they would not readily make an African country a favorite destination spot because of the uncertainty that clouds the political, social, and economic situations of many of the African countries. For such countries as Kenya, Tanzania, Egypt,

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