Working the Range: Essays on the History of Western Land Management and the Environment

By John R. Wunder | Go to book overview

Bibliographical Essay

NATIVE AMERICANS AND THEIR LAND

Sovereign land use--the control of Indian reservations and Indian homelands--is the stated goal of most organized Native American groups today. The desire to do with one's own land what one wants to do without outside governmental and private interference is a crucial portion of the modern American Indian's drive for economic self-sufficiency, particularly in agriculture.

The best general legal surveys of the struggle of Native Americans to protect their land base include Felix S. Cohen, Handbook of Federal Indian Law ( Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1942) and subsequent revision, and Monroe E. Price , Law and the American Indian ( Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merill Company, 1973) and subsequent revision. The best general historical surveys include Wilcomb Washburn, The Indian in America ( New York: Harper and Row, 1975); William T. Hagan, American Indians, rev. ed. ( Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1979); and Russel Laurence Barsh and James Youngblood Henderson, The Road: Indian Tribes and Political Liberty ( Berkeley: University of California Press, 1980).

Recent scholarship has focused upon degrees of self-determination achieved by tribal assertiveness, court decisions, or

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