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The Bourgeois Citizen in Nineteenth-Century France: Gender, Sociability, and the Uses of Emulation

By Carol E. Harrison | Go to book overview

INDEX
academies 53
old regime 24
Academy of Besançon:
conservatism of 53, 58-9, 66
finances 47-8
foundation of 53
library of 71
agricultural association 45-47
contrasted with horticultural association 106-7
in the Jura 46
Agulhon, Maurice95
Alésia, battle of 78-9
Alsace 16-17
cercles in 98
choral music in 211, 213
German annexation of 228
mutual aid societies in 132
old regime marksmen's groups 100
opposition to the Restoration 35-6
pogroms in 118
veterinarians in 203
alumni associations 197, 198-200
Amman, Peter30
anti-clericalism 33, 62, 227
anti-Semitism 118-21, 225
apprenticeship 165-6, 183-7
charitable 165-6, 183-7
'crisis of' 183
persistance of 183-4
silk workshops (Lons) 184
watchmaking ( Besançon) 184-7
Arbois 30
archaeology 67, 78
architects 203, 206
art, see fine arts
Article 291 see association: Napoleonic Code
association:
as alternative to the salon 95-7
assumptions of equality among 109, 121-2
and bourgeois status 3-4, 8-9, 14, 21, 222
bourgeois views on worker association 123, 125-6, 138-9
and Catholic laymen 178-9, 180-1
for charitable purposes 160, 162-4, 172-4, 175
as components of Mulhousien Cercle 152-3
and elimination of class conflict 124, 134, 154-5
and French republican tradition 58
and the French Revolution 25-7
generational stratification of 111-14, 115
gendering of 12, 45, 100, 104-6, 107, 222-3
involuntary, for workers 127-8, 130-1, 139
Jean Macé's understanding of 144-6, 148, 150
law of 183429
and the 'leisure question' 88-9, 90, 100
liberty of ( 1901) 24, 28, 33
membership patterns 190-1, 225
moral expectations of 45
and the Napoleonic Code 27-8, 29, 30, 33, 129, 227
need for local initiative 46

-255-

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