How Honesty Testing Works

By John B. Miner; Michael H. Capps | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

There are many people who have contributed to this book, either knowingly or unknowingly. Since the book draws heavily on research dealing with honesty testing, we are inevitably indebted to those who did that research. This has not been an easy field in which to work and what has been accomplished, given the obstacles, is rather amazing. Those who have contributed are identified in the text, and their publications are cited in full in the Bibliography at the end of the book.

In Atlanta, we want to thank the various members of the Argenbright organization with whom we worked, and in particular Frank Argenbright, who brought us both to the honesty testing field. His dedication to our own research, and his support, are appreciated very much.

In Eugene, we owe a special debt to Lewis Goldberg of the University of Oregon and the Oregon Research Institute, who earlier chaired the American Psychological Association task force on honesty testing. Lew reviewed our whole manuscript in draft form and provided us with detailed comments page by page. His contribution has been enormous. We want to emphasize that the final product is ours, not his, and that he should not be held responsible for the shortcomings in that product. But we also want to acknowledge the many hours of hard work he put in, and thank him for that work.

At Quorum we have had assistance from several editors who have helped to make this book possible and to shape its final form. These are Marcy Weiner, Eric Valentine, and Lynn Taylor. We appreciate the help all have given us.

Finally, throughout the years of our work in the honesty testing field Barbara Miner has been heavily involved. She has conducted statistical analyses, edited and typed reports, put this manuscript in a form ready for publication, and helped in just about every way imaginable. In addition to ourselves, she is the only

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