Trends in Public Opinion: A Compendium of Survey Data

By Richard G. Niemi; John Mueller et al. | Go to book overview

they prayed daily (Table 13.5), and around 30 percent attended church weekly (13.3). Similarly, while there has been some slow changes in religious preference ( Smith, 1988), the balance of major religions has not undergone any major alteration (13.2).

The Fundamentalization of American politics notion is also on the shaky ground. Support for the Supreme Court's ruling against mandatory school prayers increased moderately from the 1960s to the early 1980s (13.9) while belief in the inerrancy of the Bible fell from the 1960s to the 1980s (13.6). The possible impact of the recent activism of the Fundamentalists appears in the recent levelling off of support for the separation of church and state in the public schools and in belief in Bible inerrancy. In both cases however the levelling off follows a swing away from Fundamentalism and shows no clear sign of a reversal back toward religious conservativism ( Smith, 1988).


REFERENCES

Greeley Andrew. Forthcoming. Religious Indicators, 1935- 1985. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.

Hadden Jeffrey K. 1987. "Towards Desacralizing Secularization Theory". Social Forces, 65:587-611.

Hammond Phillip E., ed. 1985. The Sacred in a Secular Age. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Kelley Dean M. 1972. Why Conservative Churches Are Growing: A Study in Sociology of Religion. New York: Harper and Row.

Mueller Carol. 1983. "In Search of a Constituency for The New Religious Right." Public Opinion Quarterly, 46:213- 229.

Smith Tom W. 1988. Counting Flocks and Lost Sheep: Trends in Religious Preference Since World War II, GSS Social Change Report No. 26. Chicago: National opinion Research Center.

Wuthnow Robert. 1976. Recent Pattern of Secularization: A Problem of Generations? American Sociological Review, 41: 850-867.

Yinger J. Milton and Stephen J. Cutler. 1982. "The Moral Majority viewed Sociologically". Sociological Focus, 15: 289- 306.

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Trends in Public Opinion: A Compendium of Survey Data
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Tables vii
  • Acknowledgments xxi
  • Introduction 1
  • References 10
  • 1 - Politics 11
  • References 14
  • 2 - International Affairs 49
  • REPERENCES 51
  • 3 - Taxation and Spending 73
  • References 75
  • 4 - Confidence in Institutions 93
  • References 95
  • 5 - Political Tolerance 107
  • References 109
  • 6 - Crime and Violence 131
  • References 133
  • 7 - Tobacco, Alcohol, Drugs 153
  • References 155
  • 8 - Race Relations 167
  • 9 - Sexual and Reproductive Morality 187
  • References 189
  • 10 - Death and Dying 215
  • References 216
  • 11 - Role of Women 223
  • References 224
  • 12 - Work 235
  • References 237
  • 13 - Religion 251
  • References 252
  • 14 - Family 265
  • 15 - Psychological Well-Being/Group Membership 287
  • References 288
  • Index of GSS Mnemonics 317
  • Index 321
  • About the Authors 327
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