Women of Courage: Jewish and Italian Immigrant Women in New York

By Rose Laub Coser; Laura S. Anker et al. | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Any collaborative research is a complicated project involving the work of numerous people. This one is doubly so since it spanned many years, many institutions, and several researchers. Any list of acknowledgements will, therefore, inevitably leave out as many people as it recognizes.

This book is based almost entirely on interview data collected by the World of Our Mothers Project. The Russell Sage Foundation and the National Foundation for Jewish Culture provided important funding for that research. The faculty and staff of the History and Sociology departments at Stony Brook provided the collegial atmosphere and intellectual exchange that fostered the project. We offer particular thanks to Lewis Coser, Kenneth Feldman, John Gagnon, Norman Goodman, Mark Granovetter, Gary Marker, Wilbur Miller, Joel Rosenthal, William R. Taylor, Andrea Tyree, and Richard Williams for their support and assistance. Consultants William B. D'Antonio and Frank Cavioli provided valuable help with the Italian interviews.

Gladys Rothbell was the Project Director at Stony Brook, and was deeply involved in many parts of the research. Lila Czelowalnik worked tirelessly on countless tasks. They, along with Kathy Bartholomew Dahlman, contributed to the animated debates and discussions that resulted in the questionnaire and interview methodology for the project. Other invaluable staff included Tina Andolfi, Anne Harris, and Brenda Hoke. Anne Barbera generously transcribed Italian interviews free of charge. Pat O'Grady and Brenda Pepe at Boston College were invaluable assistants, conducting research, analyzing results, and pulling together piles of information. They have also been very helpful since Rose's death with keeping track of the interviews and other materials.

Various scholars and friends have contributed their time, ideas, and critical comments at different phases in the evolution of this book. Among others, we are grateful to Bonny Aarons, Minna Barrett, Dan Clawson, Blanche Weisen

-ix-

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