The Stage Clown in Shakespeare's Theatre

By Bente A. Videbæk | Go to book overview

THE STAGE CLOWN IN SHAKESPEARE'S THEATRE

Bente A. Videbæk

Contributions in Drama and Theatre Studies,

Number 69

GREENWOOD PRESS

Westport, Connecticut • London

-iii-

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The Stage Clown in Shakespeare's Theatre
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Contributions in Drama and Theatre Studies ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction 1
  • Part I - Minor Roles: Cameo Appearance, Great Effect 5
  • 1 - Rustic Clowns in Titus Andronicus, The Taming of the Shrew, Antony and Cleopatra 7
  • Notes 11
  • 2 - Servant Clowns in Romeo and Juliet, Othello, Macbeth, Timon of Athens, The Tempest 13
  • Notes 22
  • 3 - Miscellaneous Clowns in Richard III, Hamlet, Pericles, Cymbeline, The Winter's Tale 23
  • Notes 35
  • Part II - Major Roles: Expanded Function 37
  • 4 - Bottom in A Midsummer Night's Dream, Dogberry in Much Ado About Nothing 39
  • Notes 52
  • 5 - The Dromios in The Comedy of Errors, Grumio in The Taming of the Shrew, Speed and Launce in The Two Gentlemen of Verona 53
  • Notes 60
  • 6 - Costard in Love's Labour's Lost, Launcelot Gobbo in The Merchant of Venice 63
  • Notes 68
  • 7 - Pompey in Measure for Measure 69
  • Note 74
  • Part III - The Court Jesters in the Comedies 75
  • 8 - Lavatch in All's Well That Ends Well 77
  • Notes 84
  • 9 - Touchstone in As You Like It 85
  • Notes 94
  • 10 - Feste in Twelfth Night 95
  • Notes 108
  • Part IV - The Clown as The Bitter Fool"" 111
  • 11 - Thersites in Troilus and Cressida 113
  • Notes 122
  • 12 - Lear's Fool in King Lear 123
  • Notes 135
  • Part V - Falstaff as Clown 137
  • 13 - The Henriad 139
  • Notes 156
  • 14 - The Merry Wives of Windsor 159
  • Note 167
  • Part VI - Clown Characteristics in Nonclown Characters 169
  • 15 - Philip the Bastard in King John 171
  • Notes 176
  • 16 - Hamlet in Hamlet 177
  • Note 190
  • Conclusion 191
  • Appendix: The Elizabethan Clown 195
  • Notes 199
  • Bibliography 201
  • Index 207
  • Index of Acts and Scenes 213
  • About the Author 216
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