Special Education in Latin America: Experiences and Issues

By Alfredo J. Artiles; Daniel P. Hallahan | Go to book overview

4
Community-Based Early
Intervention in Jamaica:
A Home-Based Model
Incorporating Parents of
Children with Disabilities

MARIGOLD J. THORBURN

Before embarking on a discussion of the issues in this chapter, some introductory remarks are necessary to set the context. Jamaica is a small, English-speaking island in the Caribbean, and for historical, cultural, geographic, and ethnic reasons, services may have taken a very different form from those in other countries in Latin America. Therefore, information about how the service developed is important.

My original reason for initiating early intervention programs in Jamaica was that, as a physician, I saw the need for bridging the gap between diagnosis and school. Although the inspiration came in 1971 from the Milwaukee Project ( Heber & Garber, 1967), the approach was very much influenced by two mentors. First, the late Dr. G. Allan Roeher, then Director of the National Institute on Mental Retardation in Canada, strongly influenced me with the philosophy of normalization and integration. Second, the pioneering work of Sir Kenneth Standard, then Professor of Social and Preventive Medicine at the University of the West Indies, in primary health care set me on the path of what would eventually become known as community-based rehabilitation.

The primary health care model calls for low-cost service delivery provided by local, community personnel, who perform simple tasks using local resources as far as possible. This has influenced our approach to staff structure and selection, as 75 percent of our staff are recruited from the community.

The focus of this book is children with mild disabilities. Our projects have always included any child with a developmental or behavior prob

-61-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Special Education in Latin America: Experiences and Issues
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 300

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.