Special Education in Latin America: Experiences and Issues

By Alfredo J. Artiles; Daniel P. Hallahan | Go to book overview

8
Children with Learning Disabilities in Chile: Strategies to Facilitate Integration

NEVA MILICIC AND MARÍA PÍA SIUS

Traditionally, regular Chilean schools have marginahzed children with special educational needs. For instance, children with moderate disabilities are segregated at all levels of the educational system. The services offered to children with mild disabilities (e.g., specific learning disabilities or mild mental retardation) are more varied, but they have always tended to be segregated. These children may be enrolled in special education schools segregated from the regular school system or, if they are served in the mainstream, their needs are not addressed. Therefore, these students are condemned to academic failure and to drop out of school.

In the case of children with specific learning disabilities, most of their schooling takes place in the regular classroom. This is, undoubtedly, a great advantage toward their integration. However, it poses a problem to general education teachers, who face many difficulties without having additional or specialized support. This situation leads to attitudinal problems, making it difficult for the teachers to accept these children, which in turn may propitiate the students' segregation in the school context. These factors place their psychological development at risk, especially for the potential impact on their self-image and self-esteem.

Although the different special alternatives outside the regular school system satisfy a real need for attention, they do not consider many other potential effects of segregation. For instance, these alternatives focus attention on the disability and ignore the person as a whole, denying children the opportunity to relate to nondisabled peers, who constitute the majority of the community to which they belong and with whom they will deal in the future.

-169-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Special Education in Latin America: Experiences and Issues
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 300

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.