Regional Security and the Future of Central Asia: The Competition of Iran, Turkey, and Russia

By Hooman Peimani | Go to book overview
Save to active project

PREFACE

Recent developments have further strengthened the main argument of this volume. First, the two new energy agreements have significantly increased the role of Iran in the development of the energy industry of Central Asia, offering both economic rewards and political influence to that country. One is a ten-year agreement between Iran and Kazakhstan for the export of Kazakh oil via the existing Iranian facilities. It seems that two factors have convinced the Kazakhs to use the already tested Iranian route through which they exported oil in 1994 and 1995, and which will enable them to export a relatively significant amount of oil even after their own pipeline is in place. One factor is the uncertainty about the construction of the Kazakh pipeline via Russia reflected in the hesitation of the Western companies to implement their construction projects. Another is the unpredictability of future developments in Russia and that country's relations with Kazakhstan. The Kazakhs, who have been under pressure from the United States to choose the longer, less reliable, and less economically sensible and politically desirable route of Russia for their oil export, have now clearly indicated their preference for the available shorter Iranian route. This route enables them to ship their oil to the Persian Gulf and thereby to world markets much faster and more cheaply than via other routes.

The second agreement is the May 1997 Iran-Turkey-Turkmenistan agreement for the export via Iran of Turkmen natural gas to Turkey (23 billion cubic meters a year) through an Iranian pipeline. There is speculation backed by economic realities that Iran will merge this project with its 1996 agreement with Turkey for the sale of $23 billion worth of its natural gas to that country. Iran will probably construct one pipeline across its land (about 1,200 kilometres) to be used for both

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Regional Security and the Future of Central Asia: The Competition of Iran, Turkey, and Russia
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 156

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?