Does America Hate the Poor? The Other American Dilemma: Lessons for the 21st Century from the 1960s and the 1970s

By John E. Tropman | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Many people contributed to this book over the years. It is impossible to mention them all. Readers, editors, typists, each has made his or her contribution. Richard Coleman made the Boston and Kansas City data available. Henry Meyer made the Detroit data available. Rosemary Sarri made the county welfare directors data available. Roxanne Loy typed, and retyped, both text and tables. Barbara Hochrein spent many hours on the bibliographic material.

Special thanks go to a group: sundry students in the Joint Program in Social Work and Social Science at the University of Michigan. They read countless drafts, trashed many, but out of the ashes of each came a better, more focused document. Carla Parry deserves special mention. She worked tirelessly on the ideas and the structure of this book. Her suggestions for both detailed improvements and conceptual clarifications were outstanding.

Special kudos go to Rick Lane. Rick is a minister, a social worker, a clinical psychologist, and an information specialist. He is also a book lover and editor. Rick worked with me on the final preparation of the manuscript. His emmendations always enhanced, always improved, and always enriched.

I want to mention Msgr. John McCarran of Pittsburgh, and Rev. Thomas Harvey, CEO Emeritus of Catholic Charities USA. Both have retained patience through long conversations about the poor. We explored questions like, "Who are the poor?" "Why are they always with us?" "Why do we think the way we do about them?" and "Could it be different?" Their perspectives were humane and enriching.

-xi-

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Does America Hate the Poor? The Other American Dilemma: Lessons for the 21st Century from the 1960s and the 1970s
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Note x
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Part I Who are the Poor, and Does America Hate Them? 1
  • Note 4
  • Chapter 1 How America Hates the Poor 5
  • Conclusion 15
  • Notes 15
  • Chapter 2 Poorfare Culture, Welfare State 17
  • Conclusion 23
  • Part II Pictures in Plenty: Conceptions of the Underclass 25
  • Chapter 3 Laggards and Lushes: Images of the Poor 27
  • Conclusion 43
  • Notes 43
  • Chapter 4 The Decent Poverty Stricken: Images of the Near Poor 45
  • Conclusion 57
  • Chapter 5 The Overseer of the Poor: View from the County Welfare Office 59
  • Conclusion 70
  • Note 71
  • Chapter 6 Mothers: Opinions and Stereotypes 73
  • Conclusion 79
  • Note 80
  • Part III The Life Cycle Poor: Images of the Aged 81
  • Note 83
  • Chapter 7 Images of the Elderly 85
  • Conclusion 91
  • Notes 91
  • Chapter 8 American Culture and the Aged: Stereotypes and Realities 93
  • Conclusion 104
  • Notes 105
  • Chapter 9 What the Public Thinks: Older and Younger Adults 107
  • Conclusion 123
  • Note 123
  • Part IV Why America Hates Poor 125
  • Chapter 10 The Poorfare State: Embodiment and Revelation 129
  • Conclusion 131
  • Chapter 11 Social Exploitation 133
  • Conclusion 142
  • Notes 143
  • Chapter 12: Mirror of Destiny 145
  • Notes 152
  • References 153
  • Bibliography 159
  • Index 169
  • About the Author 173
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