State Police in the United States: A Socio-Historical Analysis

By H. Kenneth Bechtel | Go to book overview

Chapter 1
Introduction

The increasing complexity of modern social life has placed greater demands on the various agencies of social control and order maintenance. This is especially true for those agencies intending to deal with problems of crime control. Dunham and Alpert have noted that "as problems of social control have grown and become more complex, so have the actions and reactions of the police." 1 Because the police are viewed by most people as the first line of defense against crime and disorder, the public expectations of what the police should and can do about crime and disorder have risen accordingly. There has also been a call for increased study of the police. And, as Dunham and Alpert indicate, beginning in the mid-1970s, increased federal funding for police research and a corresponding improvement in methodological sophistication have improved significantly our level of knowledge about the police. 2

Despite the increase of research on the police, the United States police in general have been the subject of limited scientific study. Bayley has noted that this "discrepancy between the importance of the police in social life and the amount of attention given them by scholars is so striking as to require explanation." 3 Bayley suggests the lack of police research is a function of their pervasive presence, relatively routine occupational activities, and their absence as pivotal characters in major historical incidents. 4 The recent research interest in the police stems from their greater involvement in major social and political events.

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State Police in the United States: A Socio-Historical Analysis
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Tables ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Chapter 1 Introduction 1
  • Notes 9
  • Chapter 2 What Do We Know About the State Police? 13
  • Notes 22
  • Chapter 3 State Police Development, 1835-1941 25
  • Notes 44
  • Chapter 4 - The State Police in Historical Context 49
  • Notes 62
  • Chapter 5 State Police Development in Illinois, 1917-1929 65
  • Notes 85
  • Chapter 6 the State Police Movement in Illinois 89
  • Notes 110
  • Chapter 7 Creating the State Police in Colorado 113
  • Notes 130
  • Chapter 8 Analysis of the State Police Movement 133
  • Notes 145
  • Appendix - Suggestions for Further Research on the State Police 147
  • BIBLIOGRAPHIES AND DIGESTS 148
  • GENERAL WORKS--BOOKS 149
  • GENERAL WORKS--ARITICLES AND BOOK CHAPTERS 149
  • GENERAL WORKS--ARITICLES AND BOOK CHAPTERS 151
  • GENERAL WORKS--ARITICLES AND BOOK CHAPTERS 152
  • Bibliography 161
  • Index 173
  • About the Author 180
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