Total Quality Marketing: The Key to Regaining Market Shares

By Allan C. Reddy | Go to book overview

APPENDIX C
Pioneers in Quality

Product quality is essential to Total Quality Marketing, and the latter cannot function without the former. Therefore, this section reviews the background and philosophies of some pioneers in quality control management. In addition, it discusses certain important developments such as the more recent Japanese contribution to quality.


Crosby

Philip Crosby defines quality as "conformance to requirements." In service companies, for example, "the waste goes out in baskets, and in manufacturing it goes out in barrels" ( Crosby 1979, p. 15).


Deming

W. Edward Deming is a consultant and a Distinguished Professor of Management at Columbia University. Born on October 14, 1900, in Sioux City, Iowa, he received a Ph.D. in mathematical physics from Yale University in 1928. He also received the Order of Sacred Treasure, 2nd Class ( Japan) in 1960.

During the 1950s, Edward Deming made several trips to Japan to instruct the Japanese on controlling quality in production. His important message was that quality problems can be controlled through a rigorous and systematic statistical process control. Going beyond statistical instruction, he encouraged firms to use a systematic approach to problem solving. This is known as "Plan, Do, Check, Action (PDCA) or Deming Cycle" ( Deming 1982, pp. 101-104). He pushed top managers to get involved in a firm's quality programs and introduced modern methods of consumer research.


Juran

Joseph M. Juran is Chairperson Emeritus, Juran Institute, Inc. He was born on December 24, 1904, in Braila, Romania, and holds a B.S. degree in electrical

-157-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Total Quality Marketing: The Key to Regaining Market Shares
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 184

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.