The Coming of Age of Political Economy, 1815-1825

By Gary F. Langer | Go to book overview

themselves unable to meet their wage and rent obligations. Its effect upon the ruling classes was to give urgency to questions of economic management and to draw attention to the oracles of political economy.


ORGANIZATION OF THE BOOK

I have divided the chapters that follow into two parts. The first part is entitled "The Meaning of Political Economy," not because it is a search after strict definition but because, taken as a whole, it is meant to show the connection of political economy to various aspects of the social and intellectual life of the period. The meaning of any set of ideas cannot, I believe, be properly understood except in connection with the lives of the people who held them, and the reality to which they referred and of which they were a part.

"What Political Economy Meant" is the opening chapter of Part I. It aims at describing the origins and character of the scientific tradition in which the political economists of the period 1815-1825 saw themselves participating. The next two chapters examine the careers of those people who were most active and influential in bringing political economy to public attention. "The Celebrated Masters of Political Economy" focuses upon the men most accomplished and best known as economists. Most attention is placed upon the career of David Ricardo, for it was his that attracted the greatest attention of contemporaries. "Allies of Political Economy" treats the careers of those who were not economists themselves but who were nevertheless responsible for propagating its authority and bringing it to bear on political causes. "Opposition to Political Economy" describes the nature of the opposition that the economists and their doctrines provoked. That they did provoke such hostile criticism is testimony to the celebrity and influence that they acquired during these years. The chapter also shows how they and their doctrines struck those who shared neither their ideological preconceptions nor their visions of the future.

Part II is entitled "Political Economy and Society." It endeavors to describe in some detail the manner in which political economy was brought to bear on three distinct spheres of social life. These are, in fact, the spheres of social life in relation to which political economy caught on. To see how it was brought to bear on these issues is to go very far in the direction of explaining why it caught on in the way it did. "Money and Distress" treats the connection of political economy to the reform of the monetary system and to the depression of 1819- 1821, which was viewed by many contemporaries as having had its origins in the return to the gold standard begun in 1819 and championed by the Ricardians. "Free Trade" examines the relationship of the science to the free trade movement. "Free Labor" looks at the relation of the activities of the political economists and their allies to the situation of the propertyless laborer.


NOTE
1.
Sydney Smith to Francis Jeffrey, 23 September 1819, in Nowell C. Smith, ed., The Letters of Sydney Smith, 2 vols. ( Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1953), 1:338.

-9-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Coming of Age of Political Economy, 1815-1825
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 226

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.