Rethinking the Curriculum: Toward An Integrated, Interdisciplinary College Education

By Mary E. Clark ; Sandra A. Wawrytko | Go to book overview

16 WHY NOT A SEPARATE COLLEGE OF INTEGRATED STUDIES?

Russell W. Peterson


UNIVERSITIES: SOURCES OF LEADERSHIP

The principal charge of a university is to prepare people for a life of leadership. But there are at least two distinct kinds of "leadership." One refers to "leading" groups of people, and the other, to "showing the way" by expansion of human knowledge through research.

In terms of the latter--research--universities have clearly led the way. As knowledge exploded, they developed ever narrower fields of specialization. This approach has been highly successful in advancing the frontiers of knowledge, and it will no doubt continue to prosper. Recently, our growing need to research the interconnections of people, things, and ideas has also led to an increasing awareness of the inadequacies of training in narrow disciplines. One result has been the proliferation of interdisciplinary research programs that pool the knowledge of specialists from several disciplines. These have been remarkably productive despite the intellectual prejudices that often limit the horizons of specialists, but they are still suboptimal in lacking the services of true generalists who can operate effectively at the interface of several disciplines and whose thinking benefits from a symbiosis among them.

The other kind of leadership--the leadership of people and of institutions--today calls for the broadest of training, not only for understanding the complex world we live in, but also for integrating the increasingly narrow slices of knowledge developed by the disciplines and for making intelligent choices among the alternatives they seem to suggest. My lifetime careers in education, research, industrial management, politics, state and federal government, citizen action, and world conservation and development have provided me, I like to believe, with on-the-job training as a "professional" generalist. During this time I have observed firsthand

-215-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Rethinking the Curriculum: Toward An Integrated, Interdisciplinary College Education
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 274

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.