Rethinking the Curriculum: Toward An Integrated, Interdisciplinary College Education

By Mary E. Clark ; Sandra A. Wawrytko | Go to book overview
5.
The entire series, including the retreat, was partially funded by a grant from the California Council for the Humanities, authored by Richard Jacobs and David Levering of Cal Poly.
6.
The Center for Normative Studies was created in the early 1980s as an institutional umbrella for the Campus Forum, retreats, and small institutes, continuing today. The IGE Program subsequently emerged as its own administrative unit within the College of Arts.
7.
Richard Jacobs has been the Director of IGE since its inception in 1983. He has taught extensively in the program and lectured widely on its success. These comments are from an internal position paper, "The Interdisciplinary General Education Program," March 6, 1989, Cal Poly, Pomona, pp. 13-14.

SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY

"California State Polytechnic Pomona," The Forum for Liberal Education, 8, no. 4 ( March 1986), 6-8.

Johnston Joseph S. Jr.,, Susan Shaman and Robert Zemsky. Unfinished Design: The Humanities and Social Sciences in Undergraduate Engineering Education. American Association of Colleges, 1988.

Markgraf Phil, David Reinhard, Robert Ruscitto, and Pei Wang. "This Program Creates 'Better Human beings.'" Voices of Youth. Meiklejohn Education Foundation, Fall 1986, 36-37.

Romer Karen T., ed. Models of Collaboration in Undergraduate Education. Providence, R.I.: Brown University, 1985.

-252-

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