Stepping Back: Nuclear Arms Control and the End of the Cold War

By William B. Vogele | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Too many individuals and organizations have had a role in supporting the work that led to this book to really acknowledge properly. Several of the key concepts and the historical research were developed in my dissertation at Brandeis University under the guidance of Seyom Brown, Robert Art, and Robert Keohane. Without their individual and collective support, as well as their intellectual honesty, the project would have begun in much less favorable circumstances. In addition, David Larson offered patient advice on parts of the research as it evolved toward the present book. Their continuing support over the years has been greatly appreciated. They are all due credit for encouraging and promoting the good ideas that have grown into this work, and they bear no responsibility for whatever foolishness remains.

Several institutions have supported this work along the way. The Graduate School of Brandeis University made the bulk of the early work possible with fellowships and travel grants. In addition, I was fortunate to find other benefactors with faith in the project. My thanks to the Jewish Community Services of Cleveland, Ohio, which granted the Morris Abrams Award in International Relations, and to the Institute for the Study of World Politics in New York, which provided additional financial support. In more recent years, I have been fortunate to have the institutional support of the Program on Nonviolent Sanctions at Harvard University and the Albert Einstein Institution as I worked on what amounted to a new research project. Completing the present manuscript would not have been possible without the support of Doug Bond at the Program and Christopher Kruegler at Einstein. Their generous forebearance is greatly appreciated.

Colleagues, peers, mentors, and institutions all deserve credit in supporting any scholarly project. But in many ways their support cannot match the generosity, perseverance, and patience that one's family provides. Connie Parrish

-ix-

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Stepping Back: Nuclear Arms Control and the End of the Cold War
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Abbreviations xi
  • 1 - Security, Cooperation, and Arms Control 1
  • Notes 13
  • 2 - Bargaining and Cooperation 17
  • Notes 30
  • 3 - Controlling Nuclear Testing: 1954-1980 35
  • Notes 45
  • 4 - Negotiating Limits on Nuclear Testing: 1981-1992 47
  • Notes 62
  • 5 - Negotiating Limits on Strategic Nuclear Forces: 1954-1980 67
  • 6 - Negotiating the 1987 Treaty on Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces 89
  • Notes 100
  • 7 - Strategic Arms Reduction Talks: 1982-1991 105
  • Notes 130
  • 8 - Stepping Back from the Cold War 135
  • Notes 148
  • Selected Bibliography 151
  • Index 161
  • About the Author 167
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