Energizing the Energy Policy Process: The Impact of Evaluation

By Roberta W. Walsh; John G. Heilman | Go to book overview

disruptions can be anticipated and it is desirable to set a reasonable time limit, there is some risk with an ambitious schedule of failing to reach the demonstration goal simply because time ran out.

Even with the limited number of states participating and with the diversity of approaches taken, this demonstration showed that states could implement resource-leveraging partnerships to support low- income weatherization. The program evaluation helped identify what worked in the different approaches and provided insights into how to successfully implement similar partnership mechanisms in the future.


NOTES
1.
An earlier version of this chapter appears on pp. 53-59 of Proceedings, energy program evaluation: Conservation and resource management, Chicago, Illinois, 1989. The authors would like to thank Susan Heard of DOE's Office of State and Local Assistance Programs and Richard Broncato and Nancy Tate, formerly of the office, for their support throughout the project. We would also like to thank the project participants in each state whose cooperation made this evaluation possible.
2.
This work was conducted for DOE's Office of State and Local Assistance Program under Contract DE-AC06-76RLO 1830 and is reported in Callaway and Lee ( 1989).
3.
Process evaluations address how programs work. They are usually contrasted with "outcome" or "Impact" evaluations which focus primarily on program outcomes.
4.
The state projects provided tests of the feasibility of the concept proposed by DOE. They provided information that could be used by a state or DOE to decide whether to pursue such projects in the future and how to plan and implement them ( Patton, 1987).
5.
Descriptive and exploratory approaches typically deal with questions about ways in which the projects worked. Explanatory approaches deal more with casual relationships associated with why the projects worked or didn't work.
6.
See Callaway and Lee ( 1989) for a more complete description of the methodology.
7.
Ideally, a second and possibly third ranking and discussion would have occurred, but time constraints prevented this. Several rounds permit participants to reflect on the perception of other participants and move toward consensus if possible.

-179-

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