Value-Directed Management: Organizations, Customers, and Quality

By Bernard Arogyaswamy; Ron P. Simmons | Go to book overview

4
INTERDEPENDENCE: ELIMINATING INSULATION

INDIVIDUALISM AND THE FREE ENTERPRISE SYSTEM

When the Berlin Wall was breached and torn down far more was accomplished than the reunification of Germany. Communism as a guiding philosophy lost much, if not all, of its luster, particularly in Eastern Europe, and the latent hostility of the cold war went down a few notches. While subsequent events may have rendered the accompanying optimism and celebration premature it seems quite unlikely that an economic system founded on state ownership of both capital and the means of production will ever find favor on the scale that it once enjoyed. It is equally unlikely that a political ideology advocating the curbing of individual freedoms and the adoption of centrally directed plans will attract a large following anywhere.

No doubt the various recent developments in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe are a vindication of the political and economic principles which are the cornerstone upon which societies such as the United States, Western Europe, and Japan are built. If there is a dominant metaphor underlying the working of the economies of most developed countries it is that of Adam Smith's "invisible hand." Self interest and individual effort are central to Smith's vision of an ideal economic system, resulting in a price and resource allocation mechanism of unparalleled efficiency. At the heart of this free enterprise system is the individual and his or her right to choose among products, among employers, and among investment opportunities. Ayn Rand, in her voluminous works extolling capitalism constantly stressed the importance of individual effort not only in achiev

-57-

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Value-Directed Management: Organizations, Customers, and Quality
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Figures xi
  • Preface xiii
  • Acknowledgements xvii
  • 1 - Foul Play or Fair Game? 1
  • Notes 11
  • 2 - The Many Faces of Value 15
  • Notes 33
  • 3 - A Strategy and Vision of Value 37
  • Notes 53
  • 4 - Interdependence: Eliminating Insulation 57
  • Notes 76
  • 5 - Integration: Creating a Shared Vision of Value 79
  • Notes 99
  • 6 - Involvement: Power Out, Value In 103
  • Notes 122
  • 7 - In Graining: Practical Ideals 125
  • Notes 159
  • Notes 177
  • 9 - Indicators: Evaluating the Ins 179
  • Notes 205
  • 10 209
  • Notes 214
  • Selected Bibliography 217
  • Index 223
  • About the Authors 231
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