Value-Directed Management: Organizations, Customers, and Quality

By Bernard Arogyaswamy; Ron P. Simmons | Go to book overview

6
INVOLVEMENT: POWER OUT, VALUE IN

COMMUNISM AND THE CORPORATION

One of the most dramatic and cataclysmic events of the late- twentieth century has been the total rejection of and disgust shown toward Communism as a doctrine and as a philosophy of government. While the feeling of revulsion has run strongest in Eastern Europe, the likelihood of Communism emerging again on a worldwide scale as an economic and political counterpoint to free enterprise and democracy must be rated somewhere between remote and nonexistent. The domino effect, which was a dreaded possibility in Southeast Asia in the 1960s and 1970s, seems to have played itself out in a quite different context. Political pundits were stunned by the suddenness, speed, and in some cases, violence with which the Warsaw Pact disintegrated. The parting of the ways among the Republics of the Soviet Union was no less shocking even if, in hindsight, it appears to have been a logical conclusion to the anger felt and expressed in the rest of the Eastern Bloc. The transformation of the face of most of the erstwhile Communist countries has, by and large, been a bracing experience for democratic countries everywhere. Though the tensions caused by the splitting apart of nations could complicate international relations, the dilemma of MAD (Mutually Assured Destruction) and the threat of "instant" world wars have receded somewhat.

Before the alert reader gets the impression that our minds have been afflicted by a case of terminal wandering we hasten to point out the connection between Marxism's misery and our mission of value. In one word: power. If there's any lesson we should and must learn from the

-103-

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Value-Directed Management: Organizations, Customers, and Quality
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Figures xi
  • Preface xiii
  • Acknowledgements xvii
  • 1 - Foul Play or Fair Game? 1
  • Notes 11
  • 2 - The Many Faces of Value 15
  • Notes 33
  • 3 - A Strategy and Vision of Value 37
  • Notes 53
  • 4 - Interdependence: Eliminating Insulation 57
  • Notes 76
  • 5 - Integration: Creating a Shared Vision of Value 79
  • Notes 99
  • 6 - Involvement: Power Out, Value In 103
  • Notes 122
  • 7 - In Graining: Practical Ideals 125
  • Notes 159
  • Notes 177
  • 9 - Indicators: Evaluating the Ins 179
  • Notes 205
  • 10 209
  • Notes 214
  • Selected Bibliography 217
  • Index 223
  • About the Authors 231
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