Value-Directed Management: Organizations, Customers, and Quality

By Bernard Arogyaswamy; Ron P. Simmons | Go to book overview

matter of "getting there from here." It requires a judicial evaluation of what "here" is, anticipating the problems likely to arise in changing the aspects of "here" that need changing, and constantly trying to communicate and reinforce the culture we visualize for the firm, the one over "there."

Ingraining is a slow, evolutionary process and one cannot expect quick results. A preoccupation with customer needs is not likely to appear overnight in a firm which hitherto had been most concerned about production convenience and efficiency. The various aspects of SHARE, moreover, are slow-acting remedies whose results will take time to make themselves apparent. Meanwhile, the organization has to exist and, hopefully, continue to improve its performance. Firms that are embarked on the INroad to value, however, must find out what, if any, progress they have made and where they presently are. In the next chapter we lay out a variety of milestones to serve this purpose.


NOTES
1.
For a fascinating account of the quantum quandary see Michio Kaku and Jennifer Trainer, Beyond Einstein: The Cosmic Quest for the Theory of the Universe ( Toronto: Bantam, 1987), pp. 40-60.
2.
Michael Talbot Beyond the Quantum ( Toronto: Bantam, 1988) argues that the universe itself is a "super hologram" and develops hypotheses of interconnectedness among living and inanimate things, past, present, future.
3.
This distinction is emphasized by David Bohm, Wholeness and the Implicate Order ( London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1981).
4.
Our definition of culture is based upon Edgar Schein ( Organizational Culture and Leadership, San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1985, pp., 5-21) perspective. We have focused our attention on what Schein refers to as the Level 2 of culture (values) since we feel Level 1 (artifacts) is too mundane in nature and Level 3 (assumptions) too abstract. See also Bernard Arogyaswamy and Charles Byles "Organizational Culture: Internal and External Fits," Journal of Management, 1987, Vol. 13, No. 4, pp. 647-59.
5.
Bernard Arogyaswamy and Charles Byles, "Organizational Culture: Internal and External Fits," Journal of Management, 1987, Vol. 13, No. 4, pp. 647- 59.
6.
Arthur Sharplin, "The Lincoln Electric Company," in John Montanari, Cyril Morgan and Jeffrey Blacker Strategic Management ( Chicago: Dryden, 1990), pp. 807-20, and Quality, August 1983, pp. 14-15. While both cited pieces, as do most material on Lincoln Electric, emphasize the incentive system, the parallel evolution of mutual respect and recognition among hierarchic levels stands out as an equally plausible explanatory factor for Lincoln's success.
7.
Buck Rogers. The IBM Way ( New York: Harper & Row, 1987).
8.
Gary Jacobson and John Hillkirk. Xerox: American Samurai ( New York: Collier, 1986, pp. 247-48).
9.
Taiichi Ohno, Toyota's manufacturing chief for many years, said his ob

-159-

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Value-Directed Management: Organizations, Customers, and Quality
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Figures xi
  • Preface xiii
  • Acknowledgements xvii
  • 1 - Foul Play or Fair Game? 1
  • Notes 11
  • 2 - The Many Faces of Value 15
  • Notes 33
  • 3 - A Strategy and Vision of Value 37
  • Notes 53
  • 4 - Interdependence: Eliminating Insulation 57
  • Notes 76
  • 5 - Integration: Creating a Shared Vision of Value 79
  • Notes 99
  • 6 - Involvement: Power Out, Value In 103
  • Notes 122
  • 7 - In Graining: Practical Ideals 125
  • Notes 159
  • Notes 177
  • 9 - Indicators: Evaluating the Ins 179
  • Notes 205
  • 10 209
  • Notes 214
  • Selected Bibliography 217
  • Index 223
  • About the Authors 231
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