Value-Directed Management: Organizations, Customers, and Quality

By Bernard Arogyaswamy; Ron P. Simmons | Go to book overview

immediate sense, value is a process which has to be reconciled with important performance indicators or results. In addition to an overall output assessment of customer value, the input process of value creation must also be tracked and corrections made as needed. In the odyssey of value, minor navigational errors could later cause major discrepancies and require the type of radical traumatic change that a program of continuously improving value seeks to avoid. A convenient framework of indicators for the process of value is provided by the other INs themselves. The levels of Interdependence, Integration, Involvement, and Ingraining achieved by the firm are fairly reliable indexes of how effectively the firm is pursuing its stated ultimate end. To this, we now turn our attention.


NOTES
1.
Attributed to Benjamin Disraeli. Lawrence Peter, Peter's Quotations ( Toronto: Bantam, 1987), p. 477.
2.
Thomas Kinnear and James Taylor, Marketing Research: An Applied Approach ( New York: McGraw-Hill, 1979). The book provides an overview of (pp. 44-45) as well as the methodology and rationale underlying focus groups (pp. 425- 30).
3.
Joseph Hair Jr., et al., Multivariate Data Analysis ( New York: Macmillan, 1984).
4.
Frederick Webster, Marketing/or Managers, ( New York: Harper & Row, 1974), pp. 10-11.
5.
Fortune, April 7, 1980, pp. 66-70.
6.
Richard Hoffman, "Competition in Outdoor Power Equipment: Briggs & Stratton Versus Honda," in Arthur Thompson Jr. and A. J. Strickland III, Strategic Management ( Homewood, IL: Irwin, 1992), pp. 489-552.
7.
Kaoru Ishikawa and David Lu in Total Quality Control ( Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, 1985).
8.
See Richard Hoffman, "Competition in Outdoor Power Equipment: Briggs & Stratton Versus Honda."
9.
Douglas Workman, "Anheuser-Busch Companies, Inc.," in Neil Snyder et. al., Strategic Management Cases ( Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley, 1991), p. 132.
10.
Abraham Maslow, "A Theory of Human Motivation," Psychological Review 80, 1943, pp. 370-96.
11.
Standard and Poor's Industry Surveys ( New York: Standard and Poor's, 1992), pp. R86-89.
12.
For an absorbing exploration of machine/human interaction see O. B. Hardison Jr. , Disappearing Through the Skylight ( New York: Viking, 1989), pp. 317- 32.
13.
The largest retailer in the world does not rest on its laurels. Sales through customer service is the message employees hear all the time. See Fortune, September 23, 1991, pp. 47-59.
14.
In spite of its uninterrupted stream of profits over the years, Lincoln Electric

-177-

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Value-Directed Management: Organizations, Customers, and Quality
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Figures xi
  • Preface xiii
  • Acknowledgements xvii
  • 1 - Foul Play or Fair Game? 1
  • Notes 11
  • 2 - The Many Faces of Value 15
  • Notes 33
  • 3 - A Strategy and Vision of Value 37
  • Notes 53
  • 4 - Interdependence: Eliminating Insulation 57
  • Notes 76
  • 5 - Integration: Creating a Shared Vision of Value 79
  • Notes 99
  • 6 - Involvement: Power Out, Value In 103
  • Notes 122
  • 7 - In Graining: Practical Ideals 125
  • Notes 159
  • Notes 177
  • 9 - Indicators: Evaluating the Ins 179
  • Notes 205
  • 10 209
  • Notes 214
  • Selected Bibliography 217
  • Index 223
  • About the Authors 231
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