Value-Directed Management: Organizations, Customers, and Quality

By Bernard Arogyaswamy; Ron P. Simmons | Go to book overview

of management and are often useful complements to other indicators. By focusing on specific measures, however, we hope we have drawn attention to their importance and that this encourages additional effort at improvement, regardless of the imprecision involved. The use of multiple indicators builds in some redundancy and fail-safing. Finally, the measurement of measurement also often needs alteration. Accounting systems, which keep track of and record results are typically tied to modes of value creation that have been or need to be jettisoned. Just as the temperature indicated by a thermometer depends on how it is calibrated, the value indicated depends on the measuring system. In sum, a value sensitivity has to pervade individuals and groups in an organization and the activities they perform in concert with each other and with suppliers and customers. Value sensitivity is central to the indicators of value as well. As the firm evolves its unique value focus, the Indicators too will evolve with it. And changes in the measures of value must be achieved in the same way value maximization ideally should be, internally and voluntarily.


NOTES
1.
This phenomenon is likely to become increasingly evident if the members of the group are personally compatible with one another and if, moreover, there are other similar groups as well. See John Adair, Effective Technology ( New Delhi: Rupa, 1991), pp. 74-78.
2.
Stephen Hawking, A Brief History of Time ( Toronto: Bantam, 1988), pp. 15-34.
3.
Stanley Davis, Future Perfect ( Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley, 1987), pp. 19-21.
4.
Mark Beischel, "Improving Production with Process Value Analysis," Journal of Accountancy, September, 1990, pp. 53-57.
5.
Ibid.
6.
Kiyoshi Suzaki, The New Manufacturing Challenge ( New York: The Free Press, 1987), pp. 57-58. Suzaki also recommends the use of a feature called "autonomation" whereby machines are automatically shut down when they produce defective items--a further devaluation of capacity utilization (pp. 91-94).
7.
In any "adhocracy" the distinction between staff and line function tends to disappear, which means the manager becomes a purveyor of information, attempts to foresee problems, and in general becomes the facilitator of value creation. See Henry Mintzberg, "The Innovation Context," in Henry Mintzberg and James Bryant Quinn, eds., The Strategy Process ( Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, 1991), 2nd ed., pp. 732-39.
8.
Steven Fink, Crisis Management ( New York: Amacom, 1986), pp. 202-18.
9.
Ibid., pp. 20-25.
10.
George Stalk Jr., and Thomas Hart, Competing Against Time ( New York: The Free Press, 1990), pp. 1-36.
11.
Ibid., pp. 123-28.

-205-

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Value-Directed Management: Organizations, Customers, and Quality
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Figures xi
  • Preface xiii
  • Acknowledgements xvii
  • 1 - Foul Play or Fair Game? 1
  • Notes 11
  • 2 - The Many Faces of Value 15
  • Notes 33
  • 3 - A Strategy and Vision of Value 37
  • Notes 53
  • 4 - Interdependence: Eliminating Insulation 57
  • Notes 76
  • 5 - Integration: Creating a Shared Vision of Value 79
  • Notes 99
  • 6 - Involvement: Power Out, Value In 103
  • Notes 122
  • 7 - In Graining: Practical Ideals 125
  • Notes 159
  • Notes 177
  • 9 - Indicators: Evaluating the Ins 179
  • Notes 205
  • 10 209
  • Notes 214
  • Selected Bibliography 217
  • Index 223
  • About the Authors 231
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