The Ethnic Press in the United States: A Historical Analysis and Handbook

By Sally M. Miller | Go to book overview

25
The Slovene-American Press

JOSEPH D. DWYER

The Slovene people, one of the numerous Slavic nationalities, are a part of the South Slavic group. 1 Their homeland at the northeastern corner of the Adriatic Sea forms a small triangle wedged in between the Croatians, Italians, and Austrians. They have always been a relatively small national group, even today numbering somewhat less than 2 million persons. Presently they inhabit the territory of the Socialist Republic of Slovenia within the Socialist Federative Republic of Yugoslavia. In addition, the Slovenes are found as a minority group in adjacent areas of Italy and Austria.

Most Slovenes who migrated to the United States came either before 1918, when Slovene lands were a part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, or between 1918 and 1925, when they formed a part of the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes, later called the Kingdom of Yugoslavia.

The earliest Slovenes to reach North America arrived at the beginning of the nineteenth century. They were few in number (perhaps only a dozen or two) and consisted of missionaries, explorers, and merchants. There are only minimal traces left to document the presence of most of them. Certain of the missionaries, for example Reverend Friedrich (Frederik) Baraga (who eventually became bishop of Upper Michigan), Reverend Francis X. Pierz, and their followers, such as Reverend Joseph Buh, have left contributions which are more widely known. These pioneers were followed in the second half of the nineteenth century by small groups of settlers, primarily farmers, who found their way to Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Minnesota; some were also attracted to the early industries around Chicago. With the development of industry generally, and iron and coal mining specifically, the pattern began to change. At first the Slovene settlers already in the United States began moving from farms to mining and industrial centers. An example of this was the movement of Slovene farmers as a group from the area around St. Stephen in central Minnesota to the Mesabi iron range in the far north of the state in the early 1890s. Similar movements took place in Pennsylvania and other states. Before long, the news of employment opportunities spread back to the homeland, setting in motion a relatively large flow

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The Ethnic Press in the United States: A Historical Analysis and Handbook
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction xi
  • Notes xxi
  • 1: The Arabic-Language Press 1
  • Notes 13
  • Bibliography 14
  • 2: The Carpatho-Rusyn Press 15
  • Introduction 15
  • Conclusion 23
  • Notes 23
  • Notes 26
  • 3: The Chinese-American Press 27
  • Notes 39
  • Notes 42
  • 4: The Croatian Press 45
  • Notes 56
  • Notes 58
  • 5: The Danish Press 59
  • Bibliography 69
  • 6: The Dutch Press 71
  • Notes 82
  • Notes 83
  • 7: The Filipino-American Press 85
  • Introduction 85
  • Conclusion 95
  • Notes 96
  • Notes 99
  • 8: The Finnish Press 101
  • BEBLIOGRAPHY 113
  • 9: The Franco-American Press 115
  • Bibliography 128
  • 10: The German-American Press 131
  • Bibliography 158
  • 11: The Greek Press 161
  • Notes 174
  • Bibliography 176
  • 12: The Irish-American Press 177
  • Bibliography 188
  • 13: The Japanese-American Press 191
  • Bibliography 202
  • 14: The Jewish Press 203
  • Bibliography 227
  • 15: The Latvian and Lithuanian Press 229
  • Bibliography 236
  • Notes 242
  • Bibliography 244
  • 16: The Mexican-American Press 247
  • Bibliography 260
  • 17: The Norwegian-American Press 261
  • Bibliography 273
  • 18: The Polish-American Press 275
  • Bibliography 289
  • 19: The Portuguese Press 291
  • Bibliography 302
  • 20: The Puerto Rican Press 303
  • Bibliography 314
  • 21: The Romanian Press 315
  • Bibliography 324
  • 22: The Russian Press 325
  • Bibliography 335
  • 23: The Serbian Press 337
  • Bibliography 351
  • 24: The Slovak-American Press 353
  • Bibliography 368
  • 25: The Slovene-American Press 369
  • Bibliography 377
  • 26: The Swedish Press 379
  • Bibliography 391
  • 27: The Ukrainian Press 393
  • Bibliography 407
  • About the Editor and Contributors 409
  • Index 415
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