Phoenix from the Ashes: The Literature of the Remade World

By Carl B. Yoke | Go to book overview

FILMOGRAPHY FOR REMADE WORLD LITERATURE

Carl B. Yoke

It has not been my intention in this list to catalog all remade world films. Instead, I have attempted to provide a representative list so that those who are interested in pursuing the subject further may do so.

While other subgenres of fantastic literature have produced some brilliant films ( Fritz Lang Metropolis, Charlie Chaplin Modern Times, and the early 1930s productions of Dracula, Frankenstein, and Phantom of the Opera, to mention a few), remade world films have been conspicuously unremarkable, until recently, despite a large body of excellent material from which to draw. Budgets were small, special effects were poor, and adaptations had little to do with original stories for most of those films that were made.

As the social climate and public consciousness have changed in recent years, however, gifted directors and writers have turned their attention to the remade world film. Whether to send a warning (as with Threads and Testament) or to serve other purposes (see Chapter 17 for an excellent overview of the development of such films), the product has been getting better and better. No longer will remade world films be limited to the ghetto of "B" movies.

Especially useful in compiling this list were The Video Times Magazine's Your Movie Guide to Science Fiction/Fantasy Video Tapes and Discs and Roger Ebert Movie Home Companion.

Abbreviations used in this list are:

Dir director
Pro producer/producers
St star/stars
Vt variant title
W writer/writers

Blade Runner, 1982. Dir: Ridley Scott. W: Hampton Francher and David Peoples. St: Harrison Ford, Rutger Hauer, Joanna Cassidy. Based very loosely upon Phil Dick novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?

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