The Superpowers and Nuclear Arms Control: Rhetoric and Reality

By Dennis Menos | Go to book overview

Selected Excerpts

FINAL COMMUNIQUÉS OF SUMMITS

Geneva Summit (November 1985)

The sides have agreed that a nuclear war cannot be won and must never be fought. Recognizing that any conflict between the U.S.S.R. and the U.S. could have catastrophic consequences, they emphasized the importance of preventing any war between them, whether nuclear or conventional. They will not seek to achieve military superiority. . . .

They agreed to accelerate the work at the Nuclear and Space Talks with a view to accomplishing the tasks set down in the Joint U.S.--Soviet Agreement of January 8, 1985, namely to prevent an arms race in space and to terminate it on Earth, to limit and reduce nuclear arms and enhance strategic stability.

Noting the proposals recently tabled by the U.S. and the Soviet Union, they called for early progress, in particular in areas where there is common ground, including the principle of 50% reductions in the nuclear arms of the U.S. and the U.S.S.R., appropriately applied, as well as the idea of an interim INF (intermediate-range nuclear forces) agreement. . . .

The sides agreed to study the question at the expert level of centers to reduce nuclear risk, taking into account the issues and developments in the Geneva negotiations. They took satisfaction in such recent steps in this direction as the modernization of the Soviet--U.S. hotline.

General Secretary Gorbachev and President Reagan reaffirmed the commitment of the U.S.S.R. and the U.S. to the Treaty on the Nonproliferation of Nuclear Weapons and their interest in strengthening together with other countries the non- proliferation regime, and in further enhancing the effectiveness of the treaty, interalia by enlarging its membership. . . .

The U.S.S.R. and the U.S. reaffirm their commitment, assumed by them under the Treaty on the Nonproliferation of Nuclear Weapons, to pursue negotiations in good

-155-

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The Superpowers and Nuclear Arms Control: Rhetoric and Reality
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Abbreviations xiii
  • 1 - Enough is Never Enough 1
  • Notes 21
  • 2 - The Superpowers 25
  • Notes 45
  • 3 - The Impotent Opposition 49
  • Notes 67
  • 4 - Tearing Down the Few Past Accomplishments 71
  • Notes 90
  • 5 - The Politics of Arms Control 95
  • 6 - The Endless Negotiations 123
  • Notes 141
  • Appendixes 145
  • Selected Excerpts 155
  • Selected Bibliography 165
  • Index 173
  • About the Author 181
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