The Diary of Rexford G. Tugwell: The New Deal, 1932-1935

By Michael Vincent Namorato | Go to book overview

Copyright Acknowledgments
The author and publisher gratefully wish to acknowledge permission to reprint the following:
Excerpts from the articles "'They All Laughed'" ( July 3, 1933), "'Goodnight, Goodnight'" ( July 10, 1933), and "'Same With Me!'" ( July 17, 1933) from Time. Copyright 1933 Time Warner Inc. Reprinted by permission.
Arthur Krock, "Tugwell Defeats Peek," from The New York Times, December 8, 1933. Copyright © 1933 by The New York Times Company. Reprinted by permission.
Heywood Broun, "It Seems to Me," from New York World Tribune and Sun, December 18, 1933.
"The New Citizenship" ( January 29, 1934) and "Land Control" ( December 30, 1933) from St. Louis Post-Dispatch. Copyrights 1934 and 1933 respectively, Pulitzer Publishing Company, reprinted by permission.
"What the World Economic Conference Can Do" ( April 12, 1933), "Brains Trust in Policy Clash" ( July 1, 1933), "Industry Unites to Fight Food and Drug Bill" ( February 3, 1934), and "Roosevelt Approves Program for Marginal Land Purchase" ( February 28, 1934) from New York Herald Tribune © 1933 and 1934, New York Herald Tribune Inc. All rights reserved. Reprinted by permission.
Letter from F. Ryan Duffy to Franklin D. Roosevelt ( May 6, 1933) and letter from Franklin D. Roosevelt to F. Ryan Duffy ( May 16, 1933) from the President's private files, Hyde Park. Courtesy of the Franklin D. Roosevelt Library.
Letter from Edward J. Dempsey to F. Ryan Duffy, May 3, 1933. Courtesy of Timothy M. Dempsey.
Letter from H. Parker Willis to Carter Glass, November 19, 1933. H. Parker Willis Papers, Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Columbia University.
Memorandum for Governor Franklin D. Roosevelt relating to subjects discussed in conversation of November 17, 1932, by way of Professor Tugwell. James Harvey Rogers Papers, Manuscripts and Archives, Yale University Library.
Letter from Monte F. Bourjaily to Rexford G. Tugwell ( December 11, 1933) and letter from George A. Carlin to Rexford G. Tugwell ( January 26, 1934). Courtesy of United Feature Syndicate.
Letter from Harry E. Barnes to J. W. Darr. Courtesy Robert H. Barnes.
"Did Dr. Tugwell Commend 'Wine, Woman and Song?'" April 30, 1934. Reprinted from The Baltimore Sun © 1934, The Baltimore Sun Co.
Letter from Eleanor Roosevelt to Rexford G. Tugwell, March 3, 1934. Courtesy of the Franklin D. Roosevelt Library.
Grateful acknowledgment is also made to Grace F. Tugwell for allowing the use of various materials.

Every reasonable effort has been made to trace the owners of copyright materials in this book, but in some instances this has proven impossible. The author and publisher will be glad to receive information leading to more complete acknowledgments in subsequent printings of the book and in the meantime extend their apologies for any omissions.

-v-

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The Diary of Rexford G. Tugwell: The New Deal, 1932-1935
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Contributions in Economics and Economic History ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Copyright Acknowledgments v
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Preface xi
  • Rexford G. Tugwell: A Brief Sketch 1
  • Rexford G. Tugwell Diary: An Explanation 13
  • 1932 21
  • 1933 47
  • 1934 93
  • 1935 181
  • REVISED DIARY 285
  • Introduction 287
  • The Hundred Days 332
  • Addendum to the Diary for the Hundred Days 357
  • Monetary Preliminaries 367
  • The World Economic Conference 373
  • Intimations of the Civilian Conservation Corps 387
  • June 1933 to March 1934 391
  • Glossary 489
  • Bibliography 513
  • Index 517
  • About the Editor 527
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