The Diary of Rexford G. Tugwell: The New Deal, 1932-1935

By Michael Vincent Namorato | Go to book overview

Introduction

In the spring of 1932 it became apparent that Franklin Delano Roosevelt, who had been Governor of New York since 19281, might very well be the nominee of the Democratic Party for the Presidency in the election of that year. It was not yet certain; there were other contenders, some of them formidable; and there was still to be felt the strength of a stop-Roosevelt movement among all of them. But there was no doubt that he was the leading and logical candidate. The situation was one of growing tension because, as the depression, which had spread and deepened month by month since 1929, made itself felt politically, it became more and more likely that the Democrats might win. The Democratic nomination had not been so valuable in a long time or so worth contending for. Alfred E. Smith, who had run and lost in 1928, seemed to feel that the party owed him this better opportunity. And, egged on by a coterie of close associates, he not only offered himself as the candidate but actively organized the stop-Roosevelt movement.

For this reason, particularly, as well as for others, it was by no means a foregone conclusion to the dispassionate observer that the

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And before that, of course, a Vice Presidential candidate on the ticket with James M. Cox of Ohio in 1920, following eight years as Assistant Secretary of the Navy in the Wilson Administration, and a term as State Senator from Dutchess County in New York. These political experiences began in 1910 when he was 28. Until then he had been a young practicing lawyer in the firm of Ledyard, Carter and Milburn in New York City. His schooling had included Groton, Harvard and the Columbia University Law School. All this and much more is told in many accounts of his life and his associations; these will be referred to in appropriate places later, and a bibliography will be found at the end of this book.

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The Diary of Rexford G. Tugwell: The New Deal, 1932-1935
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Contributions in Economics and Economic History ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Copyright Acknowledgments v
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Preface xi
  • Rexford G. Tugwell: A Brief Sketch 1
  • Rexford G. Tugwell Diary: An Explanation 13
  • 1932 21
  • 1933 47
  • 1934 93
  • 1935 181
  • REVISED DIARY 285
  • Introduction 287
  • The Hundred Days 332
  • Addendum to the Diary for the Hundred Days 357
  • Monetary Preliminaries 367
  • The World Economic Conference 373
  • Intimations of the Civilian Conservation Corps 387
  • June 1933 to March 1934 391
  • Glossary 489
  • Bibliography 513
  • Index 517
  • About the Editor 527
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