Women Public Speakers in the United States, 1800-1925: A Bio-Critical Sourcebook

By Karlyn Kohrs Campbell | Go to book overview

way, LUCRETIA COFFIN MOTT is always Coffin Mott in second references. ( Mott is her husband James.) Originally, I planned to follow that policy only with women who began their public careers prior to marriage, such as IDA B. WELLS or ANGELINA GRIMKÉ, but the longer I worked on the volume, the less satisfactory that became, as the Coffin Mott example illustrates. Hence, throughout this work, whatever their own usage, I have incorporated the subject's birth name into all references to her, and although the practice seemed odd at first, familiarity bred satisfaction. Perhaps it may set a precedent.

Space constraints drew attention to organizational names and sources that recurred very frequently; accordingly, certain abbreviations used throughout are identified in a list of such abbreviations. Abbreviations in references in individual chapters are explained in the section on sources at the end of each chapter.

I owe a debt of gratitude to my editorial board, Professor Janice Schuetz of the University of New Mexico and Emeritus Professor Mary Margaret Roberts, Kansas State University at Pittsburg, who have done so much to improve the entries in this volume. I owe an incalculable debt to the authors, many of whom are former students, who have devoted precious research time to this project. I am hopeful that work for this project will be a springboard for subsequent publications. I also thank the College of Liberal Arts and the Graduate School of the University of Minnesota for the kinds of support that make such a project possible, and members of the Department of Speech--Communication for the support that makes such a project enjoyable, including their wonderful collegiality and penetrating criticisms. My research assistant Nathan Dick was invaluable; I particularly appreciate his careful attention to detail. Finally, I thank Professor Paul Newell Campbell, an unofficial member of the editorial board, who stepped into the breach and brought to bear his fierce feminism, his dedication to elegance and clarity in writing, and his extraordinary organizational skills, and who asked the simple questions that helped to identify the blinders, what Kenneth Burke has called the "occupational psychosis," that overtake all specialists. To the degree that these volumes are intelligible to those without extensive background in women's history, he deserves much of the credit.


SOURCES

Bacon Margaret Hope. Mothers of Feminism: The Story of Quaker Women in America. New York: Harper & Row, 1986.

Black Edwin. Rhetorical Criticism: A Study in Method. New York: Macmillan, 1965.

Campbell Karlyn Kohrs. "Hearing Women's Voices." Communication Education 40 ( January 1991):34-48.

Clarke Edward H. Sex in Education: A Fair Chance for the Girls. Boston: James R. Osgood, 1873.

Eckhardt Celia Morris. Fanny Wright: Rebel in America. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1984.

Fell Margaret Askew. Womens Speaking Justified. 1666; 1667. Intro. David J. Latt.

-xx-

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