Women Public Speakers in the United States, 1800-1925: A Bio-Critical Sourcebook

By Karlyn Kohrs Campbell | Go to book overview

SUSAN B. ANTHONY
(1820-1906), radical egalitarian of woman's right

KATHLEEN L. BARRY

Susan B. Anthony's public career as a spokeswoman for and leader of the woman's rights movement spanned fifty-six years--the entire second half of the nineteenth century into the early years of the twentieth. During that time, she witnessed small gains for women, such as slowly evolving access to higher education, and large losses, such as repeated defeats of constitutional amendments granting women suffrage. In the 1840s, her early career as a school teacher eventually led her into public speaking on temperance issues. In the early 1850s, she discovered her talent for arousing women to action in their own behalf as she built organizational structures from local societies to state and national associations. She increased opportunities for women to speak in public by organizing national woman's rights conventions and petition campaigns throughout the 1850s, even after many women activists had returned to their family responsibilities.

By the time of her arrest in 1872 for voting, Anthony had gained recognition as the charismatic leader of efforts for woman's rights. By the 1880s, she had taken her campaigns to Europe and laid the foundation for an international movement. From then until her death in 1906, in both her organizing efforts and her lectures, her focus was on women's political power through suffrage. Recognized for giving her life to the cause of women's emancipation, by the turn of the century she had become the international spokesperson of woman's rights.


BACKGROUND

Nothing in Anthony's early life presaged her extraordinary and, for many of the early years, notorious public career as the leader of woman's rights. Her name would become synonymous with the cause. She retained a charismatic appeal because she came to be viewed as embodying the very liberation she fought for in behalf of women. And yet she was an ordinary woman who was born in 1820 to a rural Massachusetts Quaker family, the third of six children. Her father was a strong temperance man who turned from farming to become one of the early developers of the northeastern cotton mills that ushered the Industrial Revolution into the United States. Quakerism made family life austere even when the family economy improved. When Anthony was seventeen, her father lost his business and even the family household possessions in an economic crash. To remove herself as an economic burden to her family, Anthony went out to teach, bringing her own rudimentary education to a halt. After ten years in the classroom, she delivered her first speech in 1849 in the small village of

-14-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Women Public Speakers in the United States, 1800-1925: A Bio-Critical Sourcebook
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 512

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.