Women Public Speakers in the United States, 1800-1925: A Bio-Critical Sourcebook

By Karlyn Kohrs Campbell | Go to book overview

Although nearly a century has passed since it ceased publication, the American Jewess continues to have relevance today. Contemporary women are challenged to find a usable past. An important part of finding such a past is to identify and reclaim rhetoric that has been lost. The American Jewess provided a forum for women who had previously been silent. In the final analysis, then, with unresolved ambivalence about the identity of the "new" Jewish woman, the American Jewess and Rosa Fassel Sonneschein allowed Jewish women to take the first steps in creating their own identity.


SOURCES

A microfilm of many issues of the American Jewess is found in the HOW Periodicals collection distributed by Research Publications, New Haven, Connecticut. Complete copies of all issues of the American Jewess exist in the microfilm collection at the American Jewish Archives (AJA), Cincinnati Campus, Hebrew Union College/Jewish Institute of Religion.


Selected Critical Studies (None is complete; most contain errors.)

Baum Charlotte, Paula Hyman, and Sonya Michel. The Jewish Woman in America. New York: New American Library, 1976.

Beifield Martin P. "A Study of the American Jewess." Unpublished essay, May 16, 1972. AJA

Berkowitz [Stafford], Sandra J. "In the Interest of Jewish Women: A Rhetorical Analysis of the American Jewess." M.A. thesis, Wake Forest University, 1987.

Berrol Selma. "Germans Versus Russians: An Update." American Jewish History 73 ( 1983):142-156.

Braude Ann. "The Jewish Woman's Encounter with American Culture." Women and Religion in America. Eds. Rosemary Radford Ruether and Rosemary Skinner Keller . San Francisco: Harper & Row, 1981. vol. 1:150-174.

Glanz Rudolf. The Jewish Woman in America: Two Female Immigrant Generations 1820-1929. Vol. 2. New York: KTAV; New York: National Council of Jewish Women, 1976.

Kuzmack Linda Gordon. Woman's Cause: The Jewish Woman's Movement in England and the United States, 1881-1933. Columbus: Ohio State University Press, 1990.

Lebeson Anita Libman. Recall to Life: Jewish Women in American History. South Brunswick, N.J.: A. S. Barnes, 1970.

Marcus Jacob Rader. The American Jewish Woman, 1654-1980. New York: KTAV; Cincinnati: American Jewish Archives, 1981.

-----. The American Jewish Woman: A Documentary History. New York: KTAV; Cincinnati: American Jewish Archives, 1981.

Porter Jack Nusan. The Jew as Outsider: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives: Collected Essays, 1974-1980. Washington, D.C.: University Press of America, 1981.

-----. "Rosa Sonnenschein [sic] and The American Jewess: The First Independent English Language Jewish Women's Journal in the United States." American Jewish History 68 ( 1978):57-63.

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