Women Public Speakers in the United States, 1800-1925: A Bio-Critical Sourcebook

By Karlyn Kohrs Campbell | Go to book overview

argued forcefully, "The right to vote, or equal civil rights, may be good demands, but true emancipation begins neither at the polls nor in courts. It begins in woman's soul" ( "The Tragedy of Woman's Emancipation,"224). Goldman's potent arguments in behalf of women's liberation and the example she provided-- sometimes painfully--in her own refusal to be bound by conventional morality inspired many of her contemporaries and continue to be inspiring today.


SOURCES

The Joseph A. Labadie Collection, University of Michigan, and the Emma Goldman Papers, New York Public Library, are the major sources of correspondence and memorabilia in this country. The Labadie Collection also includes pamphlet copies of some of her essays, the most important of which are reprinted in Red Emma Speaks. The most complete archive, which contains most of her major extant manuscripts, is the Goldman- Berkman Archives, International Institute for Social History, Amsterdam. In addition, microfiche of Mother Earth, available in many libraries, contains copies of her essays published there. Versions of many of these essays are available in Red Emma Speaks. Mother Earth ( April 1916) contains "The Social Aspects of Birth Control," an essay pertinent to Goldman's feminism that is not available elsewhere.

A comparison of titles suggests that Goldman's essays were derived from her speeches, of which there are no complete manuscript copies in this country. Thus, the two collections of essays that she published and the essays she published in Mother Earth (ME) are the best sources of texts. Red Emma Speaks includes essays from Mother Earth and other sources.

Goldman Emma. Anarchism and Other Essays. 1911. New York: Dover, 1969.

-----. The Social Significance of the Modern Drama. Boston: Richard G. Badger, 1914.

Red Emma Speaks: An Emma Goldman Reader. Comp. and ed. Alix Kates Shulman. 1972. New York: Schocken, 1983.

The Traffic in Women and Other Essays on Feminism. Ed. Alix Kates Shulman. New York: Times Change, 1970.

Vision on Fire: Emma Goldman on the Spanish Revolution. Ed. David Potter. New York: Commonground, 1983.


Selected Biographical Sources

Drinnon Richard. Rebel in Paradise: A Biography of Emma Goldman. Boston: Beacon, 1970.

Falk Candace. Love, Anarchy, and Emma Goldman. New York: Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 1984.

Goldman Emma. Living My Life. 1932. New York: Dover, 1970, and Salt Lake City, Utah: Peregrine Smith, 1982.

-----. My Disillusionment in Russia. 1923, 1924. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell, 1970.

Harris Frank. "Emma Goldman, the Famous Anarchist." Contemporary Portraits. 4th series. New York: Brentano's, 1923, pp. 222-249.

-204-

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