Women Public Speakers in the United States, 1800-1925: A Bio-Critical Sourcebook

By Karlyn Kohrs Campbell | Go to book overview

to her audiences, the impression she made on all who witnessed her public performances can be envisioned. Her insistence that woman was endowed with the same moral and political rights and responsibilities as man presaged the argument advanced by the suffrage movement in the decades to follow. Her early retirement from public life is unfortunate. How she might have further refined her oratorical skills and developed her philosophy of human rights can only be imagined.


SOURCES

The Grimké-Weld collection, Clements Library, University of Michigan, contains the correspondence of Angelina Grimké, Sarah Grimké, and Theodore Weld, some of which is published in Letters of Theodore Dwight Weld, Angelina Grimké Weld and Sarah Grimké, 1822-1844. Eds. Gilbert Barnes and Dwight Dumond. 2 vols. New York and London: D. Appleton-Century, 1934. The Weld collection, Library of Congress, has several of Grimké Weld's letters from a later period that offer insight into her religious development. The American Anti-slavery Collections, Boston Public Library, contain information on Grimké Weld's activities in abolitionist organizations.

The Public Years of Sarah and Angelina Grimké: Selected Writings, 1835-1839. Ed. and annot. Larry Ceplair. New York: Columbia University Press, 1989.


Biographical Sources

Abzug Robert H. Passionate Liberator: Theodore Dwight Weld and the Dilemma of Reform. New York: Oxford University Press, 1980.

Bartlett Elizabeth. "Introduction". Sarah Grimké: Letters on the Equality of the Sexes and Other Essays. Ed. Elizabeth Bartlett. New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 1988.

Birney Catherine H. The Grimké Sisters, Sarah and Angelina Grimké: The First American Women Advocates of Abolition and Woman's Rights. 1885. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1969.

Friedman Lawrence J. Gregarious Saints: Self and Community in American Abolitionism, 1830-1870. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1982.

Ginzburg Lori D. Women and the Work of Benevolence: Morality, Politics, and Class in the Nineteenth-Century United States. New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 1990, pp. 67-97.

Hersh Blanche Glassman. The Slavery of Sex: Feminist-Abolitionists in America. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1978.

Lerner Gerda. The Grimké Sisters from South Carolina: Rebels Against Slavery. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1967.

Lumpkin Katherine Du Pre. The Emancipation of Angelina Grimké. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1974.

Lutz, Alma. Crusade for Freedom: Women of the Anti-Slavery Movement. Boston: Beacon Press, 1968, pp. 115-144.

Melder Keith E. Beginnings of Sisterhood: The American Woman's Rights Movement, 1800-1850. New York: Schocken, 1977.

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