Women Public Speakers in the United States, 1800-1925: A Bio-Critical Sourcebook

By Karlyn Kohrs Campbell | Go to book overview
Save to active project

and for nearly all her contemporary woman's rights activists, Hart Willard's respectability and conservative rhetorical style won her almost universal admi­ ration and acclaim. By carefully limiting her arguments to advancing the cause of higher education for women, she opened the doors for these newly educated women to lobby for the vote, for legal parity, and for professional equality.

When she was elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans at New York University in 1905, the citation read: " Emma Willard devoted her life to edu­ cation. She was a woman of amazing vision for her times, and determination to work with courage for her conviction that education for women was essential to the development and well-being of the country." The medal that commemorates her selection shows her "drawing the symbolic curtain which had heretofore existed between the female student and 'higher' education."


SOURCES

Emma Hart Willard Correspondence, 1809-1866, Archives of the Emma Willard School, Troy, New York, contains original letters and copies or typed transcriptions of original letters with the location of original documents given. See annotated Finder's Guide prepared by Marion P. Munzler, 1986.

Willard Emma ( 1829 circa). "Notes on Plan of Female Education." Holographic. Russell Sage College, Troy, New York.

"A Plan for Improving Female Education (1819)." Woman and Higher Education. Ed. Anna C. Brackett. New York: Harper Brothers, 1893.

"Memorial of Emma Willard, Principal of Troy Female Seminary to the Honorable the Legislature of the State of New York". Proceedings of the State Legislature of the State of New York, January 25, 1823.

"A Letter to Bolivar." The Lady's Book, June 1837.

"Universal Terms--Disputes Concerning Them and Their Causes." American Journal of Science & Arts 23, no. 1 ( 1832):19-28.

Journal and Letters from France and Great Britain. New York: Tuttle, 1833.

Advancement of Female Education, or, A Series of Addresses, in Favor of Establishing at Athens, in Greece, a Female Seminary, Especially Designed to Instruct Female Teachers. Troy: Norman Tuttle, 1833.

"Kensington or Berlin Third School Society"; "Berlin, First School Society, or Kensington"; "Kensington, or Berlin First School Society". Connecticut Common School Journal ( June 2, 1840):241-244; ( September 3, 1840):54-55; ( November 15, 1840):29- 31.

"The Relation of Females and Mothers especially to the Cause of Common School Improvement." Connecticut Common School Journal ( March 15, 1842):64-66.

"Letter to the Editor." The Trojan Sketchbook. Troy, N.Y.: Young & Hart, 1846.

Answer to Marcius Willson's Reply, or Second Appeal to the Public. New York: A. S. Barnes, 1847.

"Letter to DuPont de L'Eure on the Political Position of Women." American Literary Magazine ( April 1848).

"Address on the time and teaching of little children. Read to the Rensselaer CountyTeacher's Association"

-252-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Women Public Speakers in the United States, 1800-1925: A Bio-Critical Sourcebook
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 512

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.