Women Public Speakers in the United States, 1800-1925: A Bio-Critical Sourcebook

By Karlyn Kohrs Campbell | Go to book overview

west" were rewarded. Scott Duniway penned and countersigned the gubernatorial proclamation that made suffrage a reality.


SOURCES

Those who wish to study Scott Duniway's rhetoric will want to consult two major primary sources. The holdings of the Oregon Historical Society Library, Portland, include scrapbooks with clippings and other material related to woman suffrage, the Pacific Empire (PE) in text, the New Northwest (NNW) on microfilm (5 reels), other regional newspapers that printed her work, notably the Oregon Farmer, the Oregon City Argus, and the ( Portland) Oregonian (OR), all on microfilm, the records of the Duniway Publishing Company and the Oregon State Equal Suffrage Association, and some correspondence, notably in the Eva Emery Dye Papers (two boxes). Scott Duniway's personal papers are in the possession of her grandson, David C. Duniway (DCD) of Salem, Oregon. Included here are manuscripts of speeches, poetry, and novels, two scrapbooks ( ASD I & II) primarily of news clippings and editorial columns (as a journalist, Scott Duniway subscribed to a clipping service), suffrage campaign materials, the overland diary she kept on the trip from Illinois, business records, and correspondence with family and others. Because she also wrote occasionally for the Revolution, TWJ, and the Woman's Tribune, scholars may wish to consult the History of Women collection microfilmed by the Schlesinger Library at Radcliffe. Finally, the Archives of the Oregon State Library (OSL) contain some miscellaneous materials.

Duniway Abigail Scott. Path Breaking: An Autobiographical History of the Equal Suffrage Movement in Pacific Coast States. 2nd ed. 1914. New York: Schocken, 1971. (PB)

Edwards G. Thomas. Sowing Good Seeds: The Northwest Suffrage Campaigns of Susan B. Anthony. Portland: Oregon Historical Society, 1990.

HWS 4:Ch. 54; HWS 5:Ch. 60; HWS 6:Ch. 56.


Selected Critical References

Bandow Gayle R. "'In Pursuit of a Purpose': Abigail Scott Duniway and the New Northwest." M.A. thesis, University of Oregon, 1973.

Bennion Sherilyn Cox. "The New Northwest and Woman's Exponent: Early Voices for Suffrage." Journalism Quarterly 54 ( 1977):286-292.

Burke Kenneth. A Grammar of Motives. 1945. Berkeley, Calif.: University of California Press, 1969.

Kessler Lauren. "A Siege of the Citadels: Search for a Public Forum for the Ideas of Oregon Woman Suffrage." Oregon Historical Quarterly 84 ( 1983):117-149.

Mansfield Dorothy M. "Abigail S. Duniway: Suffragette [sic] with Not-so-common Sense." Western Speech 35 ( 1971):24-29.

McKern Roberta O. "The Woman Suffrage Movement in Oregon and the Oregon Press. M.A. thesis, University of Oregon, 1975.

Montague Martha Frances. "The Woman Suffrage Movement in Oregon." M.A. thesis, University of Oregon, 1930.

Ward Jean M. "The Emergence of a Mentor-Protege Relationship: The 1871 Pacific Northwest Lecture Tour of Susan B. Anthony and Abigail Scott Duniway."

-405-

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