'Hold up his head, so that if there is any breath it may come on the glass.'

'He's dead, right enough. You see, dear, there's not a trace of breath on the glass.'

'I'd like to say a prayer. Will you say a prayer with me?'

'Yes, I feel as if I should like to myself; it eases the heart wonderful.'


CHAPTER XLIV

SHE stood on the platform watching the receding train. The white steam curled above the few bushes that hid the curve of the line, evaporating in the pale evening. A moment more and the last carriage would pass out of sight, the white gates at the crossing swinging slowly forward to let through the impatient passengers.

An oblong box painted reddish brown lay on the seat beside a woman of seven or eight and thirty, stout and strongly built, short arms and hard-worked hands, dressed in dingy black skirt and a threadbare jacket too thin for the dampness of a November day. Her face was a blunt outline, and the grey eyes reflected all the natural prose of the Saxon.

The porter told her that he would try to send her box up to Woodview to-morrow. That was the way to Woodview, right up the lane. She could not miss it. She would find the lodge gate behind that clump of trees. And thinking how she could get her box to Woodview that evening, she looked at the barren strip of country lying between the downs and the shingle beach. The little town clamped about its deserted harbour seemed more than ever like falling to pieces like a derelict vessel, and when Esther passed over the level crossing she noticed that the line of little villas had not increased; they were as she had left them eighteen years

-376-

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Esther Waters
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • OXFORD WORLD'S CLASSICS ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction vii
  • NOTE ON THE TEXT xxiii
  • SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY xxv
  • A CHRONOLOGY OF GEORGE MOORE xxvii
  • EPISTLE DEDICATORY xxix
  • Chapter I 1
  • Chapter II 8
  • Chapter II 22
  • Chapter IV 32
  • Chapter VI 41
  • Chapter VI 47
  • Chapter VI 50
  • Chapter VI 56
  • Chapter VI 67
  • Chapter VI 72
  • Chapter XII 84
  • Chapter XIII 94
  • Chapter XIV 109
  • Chapter XV 115
  • Chapter XVI 120
  • Chapter XVII 126
  • Chapter XVII 138
  • Chapter XVII 152
  • Chapter XVII 161
  • Chapter XVII 175
  • Chapter XXII 182
  • Chapter XXIII 185
  • Chapter XXIII 192
  • Chapter XXV 198
  • Chapter XXVI 214
  • Chapter XXVI 232
  • Chapter XXVI 237
  • Chapter XXVI 239
  • Chapter XXVI 248
  • Chapter XXVI 265
  • Chapter XXVI 272
  • Chapter XXVI 281
  • Chapter XXVI 288
  • Chapter XXVI 300
  • Chapter XXVI 308
  • Chapter XXVI 311
  • Chapter XXVI 321
  • Chapter XXVI 326
  • Chapter XXVI 336
  • Chapter XXVI 343
  • Chapter XLII 358
  • Chapter XLIII 366
  • Chapter XLIII 376
  • Chapter XLIII 384
  • Chapter XLIII 388
  • Chapter XLVII 392
  • EXPLANATORY NOTES 397
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