EXPLANATORY NOTES
Page 5. Bow Bells: Bow Bells. A Weekly Magazine of General Literature and Art, for Family Reading--a cheap, illustrated fiction magazine, 1862-97.
Page 16. Leopold Rothschild: famous racehorse owner, born 1845, third son of the banker, Baron Lionel de Rothschild.
Page 22. Plymouth Brother: member of a sect founded in Plymouth in 1830, which rejected all church order and outward forms of worship.
Page 23. the curiosity line: dealing in curiosities, or rare and strange objects.
Page 32. Bell's Life . . . Sportsman: Bell's Life in London and Sporting Chronicle, 1822-86. The Sportsman, 1865-1924.
Page 36. crack: excellent horse, which has been 'cracked up' or eulogized.
Page 50. drag: private vehicle, resembling a stage-coach in design, having seats inside and on top.
Page 61. Sporting Life: successor to Penny Bell's Life and Sporting News, 1859-.
Page 66. Italian house: 'Italian' was a style of English domestic architecture fashionable at the period in which the action is set (c. 1870), in reaction against neo-Gothic. Its usual hallmark is a square, corner tower.
Page 91. (1) more joy . . . just men: Luke 15:7, 'Joy shall be in heaven over one sinner that repenteth, more than over ninety and nine just persons, which need no repentance.'

(2) woman of Samaria: Although the Jews had 'no dealings with the Samarians', with whom there was open enmity, Jesus reveals himself to a woman of Samaria in John 4.

Page 112. longcloth: calico or (as here) cotton cloth made in long lengths.
Page 156. baptism: not originally knowing Plymouth Brethren to be opposed to infant baptism, Moore has Esther baptize her baby in the first edition.
Page 175. registry office: employment bureau.
Page 186. sermon-paper: writing paper of foolscap quarto size.
Page 188. the Close or the Open: the split between the Open and the

-397-

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Table of contents

Table of contents

  • OXFORD WORLD'S CLASSICS ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction vii
  • NOTE ON THE TEXT xxiii
  • SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY xxv
  • A CHRONOLOGY OF GEORGE MOORE xxvii
  • EPISTLE DEDICATORY xxix
  • Chapter I 1
  • Chapter II 8
  • Chapter II 22
  • Chapter IV 32
  • Chapter VI 41
  • Chapter VI 47
  • Chapter VI 50
  • Chapter VI 56
  • Chapter VI 67
  • Chapter VI 72
  • Chapter XII 84
  • Chapter XIII 94
  • Chapter XIV 109
  • Chapter XV 115
  • Chapter XVI 120
  • Chapter XVII 126
  • Chapter XVII 138
  • Chapter XVII 152
  • Chapter XVII 161
  • Chapter XVII 175
  • Chapter XXII 182
  • Chapter XXIII 185
  • Chapter XXIII 192
  • Chapter XXV 198
  • Chapter XXVI 214
  • Chapter XXVI 232
  • Chapter XXVI 237
  • Chapter XXVI 239
  • Chapter XXVI 248
  • Chapter XXVI 265
  • Chapter XXVI 272
  • Chapter XXVI 281
  • Chapter XXVI 288
  • Chapter XXVI 300
  • Chapter XXVI 308
  • Chapter XXVI 311
  • Chapter XXVI 321
  • Chapter XXVI 326
  • Chapter XXVI 336
  • Chapter XXVI 343
  • Chapter XLII 358
  • Chapter XLIII 366
  • Chapter XLIII 376
  • Chapter XLIII 384
  • Chapter XLIII 388
  • Chapter XLVII 392
  • EXPLANATORY NOTES 397
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